20-year intergenerational longitudinal followup of females abused as children

Project: Research project

Description

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Few longitudinal cohorts span multiple developmental stages and extend across generations. The PIs have been successful at retaining 96% of a sample of females who experienced substantiated childhood sexual abuse (N=84) and a demographically similar comparison group (N=89) for 20 years;accomplishing comprehensive bio-psychological assessments three times (T1-T3) in childhood/early adolescence, twice (T4 &T5) in later adolescence/emerging adulthood, and once in young adulthood (T6). We have also assessed 91% of all known offspring born to the sample (N=135). Results generated thus far have contributed substantially to the literature on the long-term sequelae and intergenerational transference of the effects of abuse on female development. An additional followup assessment (T7) which would employ new technologies (including remote web and PC-based assessment tools) and emerging theoretical models (including geneXenvironment and hormone models of risk and resilience) will allow us to contribute much, much more. However, in order to produce the most competitive R01 aimed at a T7 followup, we must first establish feasibility in piloting emergent, innovative methodologies and ascertain from the sample both the ways in which they can/will participate and the demographic make up of the offspring sample as it is now comprised. Further, this is a particularly vulnerable population so it is vitally important that we take the time to carefully and sensitively integrate emerging technologies (genetics in particular) into our protocols. Hence, this application seeks to develop innovative methodologies and new technology to advance developmental research and proposes to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing these techniques to accomplish the 20-year followup of the longest, ongoing study of the impact of childhood abuse on female development. This feasibility study will set the stage for a highly innovative, competitive R01 aimed at testing comprehensive geneXenvironment and bio- psycho-social models of risk and resilience throughout development and across generations for females abused in childhood and their families. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: This is a feasibility study to locate and recontact families participating in a 20-year longitudinal study to ascertain demographic updates and willingness to participate in a 7th wave. A subset of families will undergo pilot testing of new technologies including the use of para-professionals for biological sampling (including genetic sampling) and remote web and PC-based assessment procedures for adult participants and their offspring. The study will set the stage for a highly innovative, competitive R01 aimed at testing complex multivariate psychosocial, genetic predisposition, gene-environment interaction, and biobehavioral models of risk and resilience throughout development and across generations for females abused in childhood and their families.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date7/19/106/30/13

Funding

  • National Institutes of Health: $76,250.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $73,440.00

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childhood
resilience
new technology
PC
adulthood
adolescence
abuse
transference
methodology
applicant
sexual violence
longitudinal study
interaction
Group