CAREER: Mesoscopic Phenomena and Band-Structure Engineering in Single-Layer and Bilayer Graphene

Project: Research project

Project Details

Description

Technical: The goal of this Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) project at the Pennsylvania State University is to explore mesoscopic physics in a newly discovered two-dimensional material: graphene. Graphene, a single sheet of carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal lattice, possesses a set of unusual physical properties which may lead to new physics in two dimensions. A closely-coupled second layer (bilayer graphene) enhances the richness and complexity of the system, providing even more intriguing opportunities. Graphene is also a promising material for high-speed electronics thanks to its highly mobile charge carriers. The uniting theme of this project is to use geometrical, electrical and chemical manipulations of various substrates and adsorbates to modulate and study the electronic properties of single and bilayer graphene. Mesoscopic confinement structures will be created to explore new phenomena arising from graphene's unique band structure, lattice symmetry and spin interactions. The educational component of this project will provide career training for graduate and undergraduate researchers. Research results from the PI's lab and the field of nanoscience will be disseminated to the public through on- and off-campus venues including local libraries and the arts festival. The PI will use her role as a co-coordinator of the Penn State REU program to draw the participation of students from underrepresented groups in this project. Non-technical: The goal of this Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) project at the Pennsylvania State University is to explore the electronic properties of a newly discovered two-dimensional material: graphene. Graphene, a single sheet of carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal lattice, possesses a set of unusual physical properties which may lead to new physics in two dimensions. A closely coupled second layer (bilayer graphene) enhances the richness and complexity of the system, providing even more intriguing opportunities. Graphene is also a promising new material for high-speed electronics thanks to its highly mobile charge carriers. The uniting theme of this project is to create novel structures on the micro- and nano-sale through geometrical, electrical and chemical manipulations of graphene and to explore their electrical transport properties. New device configurations will be developed to take advantage of graphene's excellent electrical properties. The educational component of this project will provide career training for graduate and undergraduate researchers. Research results from the PI's lab and the field of nanoscience will be disseminated to the public through on- and off-campus venues including local libraries and the arts festival. The PI will use her role as a co-coordinator of the Penn State REU program to draw the participation of students from underrepresented groups in this project.

StatusFinished
Effective start/end date2/1/081/31/14

Funding

  • National Science Foundation: $300,000.00
  • National Science Foundation: $500,000.00

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