CHARACTERIZING NEURONAL INFECTION AND SPREAD OF WEST NILE VIRUS

Project: Research project

Project Details

Description

Viruses that spread to and infect the brain are termed neuroinvasive. There are few therapies to treat neuroinvasive viral infections, resulting in high and rapid mortality after the onset of neurological symptoms. Neuroinvasive viruses of animals include; alphaherpesviruses, such as Pseudorabies virus (PRV) and flaviviruses such as West Nile virus (WNV). WNV is an emergent arboviral pathogen, transmitted by mosquitoes, that normally infects birds and can zoonotically infect animals, including horses and sheep. This virus has been expanding its geographic range, resulting in recurrent epidemics in horses in the Rocky Mountain States, including Montana, since 2003. This project will quantify spread of neuroinvasive WNV in cells, understand the mechanism of antiviral restrictions on spread, and identify the variations in viral genomes that affect the capacity to elicit severe disease. This research will identify new targets for therapeutic development that can improve treatments for diverse neuroinvasive viral infections of animals.

StatusFinished
Effective start/end date7/1/106/30/18

Funding

  • National Science Foundation: $562,134.00

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