DELAYED FURROW AND NEURAL MORPHOGENESIS

Project: Research project

Project Details

Description

DESCRIPTION (adapted from the investigator's abstract): One of the
fundamental questions in developmental biology is how cells communicate
with each other in determining cell fate and pattern formation.
Inductive signal transduction that utilizes diffusible extracellular
signaling molecules plays an important role in this process. For
instance, two secreted molecules Hedgehog (Hh) and the transforming
growth factor (TGF-B) homologue Decapentaplegic (Dpp) are essential for
patterning the Drosophila eye, which provides a model system for a
molecular and genetic dissection of the signaling hierarchy mediated by
secreted molecules. Dr. Lai has recently identified a potential key
component, Delayed furrow (Defu), of the Hh signaling pathway. Mutations
in the delayed furrow gene slow down progression of the morphogenetic
furrow in eye imaginal discs, and this phenotype is enhanced by hedgehog
mutations. A long term objective of this research is to elucidate basic
mechanisms and principles of neural morphogenesis. The immediate goal
is to test a hypothesis that Defu protein participates with Hedgehog to
provide cells with positional information for pattern formation, by
utilizing a combination of genetic, molecular and cellular approaches.
Specific experimental aims are:

1) To characterize null phenotypes of defu in eye morphogenesis; 2) To
molecularly clone and characterize the defu gene; 3) To reveal mechanisms
by which Defu participates with Hh in neural morphogenesis.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date9/1/967/31/01

Funding

  • National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
  • National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
  • National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: $97,676.00
  • National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
  • National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

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