EFFECTIVENESS AND OUTCOMES OF HYSTERECTOMY

Project: Research project

Project Details

Description

Hysterectomy is the second most frequent major surgery in the United
States, second only to cesarean section. Thirty-seven percent of women in
the United States aged 60 or over have had a hysterectomy. Estimates of
the complication rate for hysterectomy range from 20% to 50% and include
operative and postoperative hemorrhage, wound infection, cystitis and
associated infections and surgical damage to adjacent organs. Longer term
consequences include sexual dysfunction, depression, fatigue, vertigo,
sleeping problems and urinary and bowel problems. Black women have higher
rates of hysterectomy, higher complication rates and twice the mortality
rate than for White women undergoing hysterectomy. The objectives of the
proposed study are to address several gaps in the literature as concerns
hysterectomy. These objectives are 1.) To conduct a 2 year prospective
study of 1,000 women receiving hysterectomy in the State of Maryland, with
patient interviews prior to surgery and at 5 points in time after surgery
(3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months), as well as chart review and physician
interview, in order to examine the decision making process and outcomes of
hysterectomy focusing on mortality, morbidity, health status, functional
capacity, and quality of life, 2.) to examine the extent to which surgical
procedure (vaginal vs abdominal) and ovary removal affect outcomes, 3.) to
examine the extent to which patient race and other socioeconomic factors
affect the decision making process and outcomes of hysterectomy.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date9/1/912/29/96

Funding

  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health

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