MODELING RISK OF DRUG ABUSE WITH AN EXPANDED LATENT TRANSITION ANALYSIS METHOD

  • Collins, Linda Marie (PI)
  • Li, Runze (PI)
  • Collins, Linda Marie (PI)
  • COLLINS, LINDA (PI)
  • COLLINS, LINDA (PI)
  • Sayer, Aline (PI)
  • SCHAFER, JOSEPH (PI)
  • MURPHY, SUSAN (PI)
  • Graham, John (PI)
  • Sayer, Aline (PI)
  • SCHAFER, JOSEPH (PI)
  • MURPHY, SUSAN (PI)
  • Graham, John (PI)
  • COLLINS, LINDA (PI)
  • COLLINS, LINDA (PI)
  • Luo, Zhen (PI)
  • SCHAFER, JOSEPH (PI)
  • FOSTER, EDWARD MICHAEL (PI)
  • FOSTER, EDWARD MICHAEL (PI)
  • Runze, Li (PI)
  • MURPHY, SUSAN (PI)
  • SCHAFER, JOSEPH (PI)
  • COLLINS, LINDA (PI)
  • LANZA, STEPHANIE (PI)
  • COFFMAN, DONNA LYNN (PI)
  • COLLINS, LINDA (PI)

Project: Research project

Project Details

Description

Stage sequences play a major role is theory-based prevention research,
where they have ben featured for years in models of the onset of use of
individual substances and in models of multiple substance use onset.
Latent Transition Analysis (LTA), a relatively new statistical methodology
for estimating and testing stage-sequential models, has been developed as
part of a previous and a current NIDA grant. LTA has been demonstrated to
be highly useful in theory-based substance use prevention research, where
it has provided a new, interesting, and uniquely revealing look at
prevention data. The proposed research will develop and implement a major
expansion of lTA, greatly broadening the usefulness of this procedure. In
the proposed research we will add to LTA the capability of estimating and
testing models where one stage-sequential process is used to predict
another. Four different types of prediction will be implemented: (1)
concomitant processes, where two stage sequential processes in separate
domains tend to track along together over time (example: a target child and
his or her peers tend to be ina the same stage of the onset process, even
when stage membership changes over time); (2) lagged concomitant, where two
stage sequences in separate domains tend to track along together over time,
but the relation is separated by time (example: the stage peers are in at
Time 1 coincides with the stage a target child is in at some specified
later time); (3) dynamically concomitant, where the change in one stage-
sequential process predicts the change in another (example: whenever there
is a stage transition in peer use there is an accompanying stage transition
in use by a target child, even when the target child and his or her peers
are not in the same stage of the onset process); and (4) dynamically
lagged, where the change in one sequence predicts change in the other
sequence occurring after a period of time)example; stage transitions in
peer use are followed by stage transitions in target child use a month
later). Throughout the entire project, we will make use of the latest
improvements to the LTA procedure to analyze existing substance use
prevention data from Project AAPT. The AAPT of data will allow us the
opportunity to use LTA to learn more about risk, protective factors,
vulnerability, and resiliency in relation to changes in substance use
behavior ina the years from age ten to young adulthood.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date1/1/018/31/16

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