Neural Basis of Resting-State Functional Connectivity

Project: Research project

Description

? DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) has been widely used to map large-scale brain networks and their pathological changes under with various brain diseases. Although a neural basis for the rsfMRI signals has been established with electrophysiological studies, the nature of the underlying neural correlates remains largely unknown. The lack of understanding of the specific neural correlates and generative mechanisms of rsfMRI network correlations hampers their interpretation. The overall goal of the proposed research is to elucidate specific neural correlates and generative mechanisms that lead to rsfMRI signal correlations. The research objective will be achieved through two specific aims: Aim 1 is to elucidate the neural correlate and generative mechanism of region-specific correlations in resting-state signals with using large-scale electrophysiologica recordings and concurrent fMRI-electrophysiological measurements. Aim 2 is to identify specific electrophysiological events that contribute to global, spatially non-specific fMRI correlations and clarify their link to the brain's vigilance level, also using multi-modal approach. The proposed research is innovative, because it will be the first attempt to deconstruct rsfMRI correlations int two core components, each with a mechanism that can be characterized on electrophysiological grounds. The impact of this research is highly significant, because the identification of distinct electrophysiological contributions to rsfMRI signals will improve the understanding of functional networks and help interpret the relationship between abnormalities in networks and pathology.
StatusActive
Effective start/end date4/1/173/31/20

Funding

  • National Institutes of Health: $239,587.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $243,548.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $248,956.00

Fingerprint

Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Research
Brain
Brain Diseases
Pathology