VERBAL MEMORY--BRAIN-INJURY MEMORY DISORDERS

  • Eslinger, Paul (PI)
  • CERMAK, LAIRD (PI)
  • VERFAELLIE, MIEKE (PI)
  • VERFAELLIE, MIEKE (PI)
  • O'CONNOR, MARGARET (PI)
  • MILBERG, WILLIAM (PI)
  • BAUER, RUSSELL (PI)
  • LAIRD, CERMAK (PI)
  • Alexander, Michael (PI)
  • GABRIELI, JOHN (PI)
  • VERFAELLIE, MIEKE (PI)
  • O'CONNOR, MARGARET (PI)
  • MILBERG, WILLIAM (PI)
  • BAUER, RUSSELL (PI)
  • LAIRD, CERMAK (PI)
  • Alexander, Michael (PI)

Project: Research project

Project Details

Description

This project aims to uncover which memory processes are impaired and which
memory processes are spared in amnesia by analyzing in detail the amnesic's
performance as a function of the processing demands underlying various
verbal memory tasks. The studies are organized around three areas of
information processing which are thought to be critical to the formation of
new verbal memories. In a first section, the amnesic's initial analysis of
verbal information is studied using paradigms that tap lexical processing
on-line. Using both single words and sentences as stimuli, the hypothesis
is tested that amnesics will perform normally on tasks in which the context
guides stimulus analysis, but will be deficient at tasks which require
self-generated processes. The implications of this distinction for
repetition priming effects are also examined. In a second section, the
effects of a single study episode on memory abilities downstream from
initial analysis are examined. This is done using traditional implicit
memory tasks as well as oppositional memory tasks which attempt to isolate
the automatic and effortful effects of memory. Finally, in a third group
of studies, the effects of repeated exposure to verbal stimuli will be
investigated. To examine whether amnesics can acquire generic, context-
free knowledge through a compilation of episodic events, their effortful
and automatic use of words which are new to the English vocabulary is
compared. Subsequent studies focus on the effortful use of memory and
examine whether amnesics can benefit from repeated exposure within the
limits set by their memory for single presentations.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date1/1/012/28/05

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