VISUAL MOTION PROCESSING DURING OBSERVER MOVEMENT

Project: Research project

Description

Cerebral cortex lesions, at the junction of the posterior parietal and
superior temporal areas, cause an incapacitating syndrome of visuospatial
disorientation (Holmes, 1918). The fact that visual, vestibular, or
somatosensory pathology may also disrupt spatial orientation suggests
that these mechanisms are integrated into a multisensory percept of
extrapersonal space, possibly within parietotemporal cortex. During
self-movement, visual motion processing interacts with vestibular and
somatosensory mechanisms to support spatial orientation. I propose to
test whether parietotemporal neurons might contribute to those
interactions by recording neuronal responses to visual and non-visual
motion stimuli. The activity of single neurons in parietotemporal areas MSTd and 7A of
awake monkeys will be recorded during visual motion simulations of the
self-movement scene, during vestibular and somatosensory activation by
passive linear movement. Three sets of experiments are planned to
examine critical issues regarding neuronal responses and self-movement
perception. First, I will compare the relative selectivity of these
neurons for the patterned visual motion seen during observer movement
(optic flow) and visual figure motion, which can result from observer or
object movement. Second, I will record the responses of these neurons
to linear self-movement in the dark and determine what contributions
vestibular and somatosensory mechanisms might make to those responses.
Third, I will combine visual motion with linear self-movement to define
the dynamics of multisensory interactions in these neurons. These studies will test the capacity of MSTd and 7A neurons to integrate
visual, vestibular and somatosensory information during self-movement.
My goal is to characterize their potential contributions to spatial
vision, locomotor, and oculomotor control. The results will be relevant
to understanding central mechanisms which serve fundamental behavioral
capacities such as the stabilization of gain and gaze, and the
maintenance of spatial orientation. In addition, the results will
provide a basic understanding of how spatial vision might interact with
the vestibular and somatosensory systems to maintain postural control in
health, disease, and aging.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date7/1/946/30/10

Funding

  • National Institutes of Health: $380,835.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $32,754.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $303,251.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $378,702.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $371,129.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $378,702.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $452,570.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $315,378.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $304,428.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $288,414.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $248,797.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $347,942.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $191,589.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $177,134.00

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Neurons
Optic Flow
Cues
Behavior Control
Confusion
Accidents
Motion Perception
Costs and Cost Analysis
Sensory Receptor Cells
Temporal Lobe
Cerebral Cortex
Haplorhini
Direction compound
Population
Alzheimer Disease
Pathology
Head
Spatial Orientation