1997 Spring and fall cabbage cultivar trials in Pennsylvania

M. D. Orzolek, William James Lamont, Jr., L. Otjen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Twenty-two cabbage cultivars were evaluated in the spring and 26 cabbage cultivars evaluated in the fall of 1997. The cultivars were evaluated for uniformity of maturity, marketable yield, percent cull, stem core length, and head firmness. In addition, three heads of each cultivar were tasted at harvest by the summer farm crew and responses noted on the data collection forms. The highest yielding cultivars were not necessarily the best performing ones evaluated in the trial. Average head weight was significantly different between spring and fall plantings. Data from this trial suggests that multiple cultivars should be grown in Pennsylvania based on whether it is a spring or fall cabbage crop.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)218-221
Number of pages4
JournalHortTechnology
Volume10
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

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cabbage
cultivars
high-yielding varieties
firmness
planting
farms
stems
summer
crops

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Horticulture

Cite this

Orzolek, M. D., Lamont, Jr., W. J., & Otjen, L. (2000). 1997 Spring and fall cabbage cultivar trials in Pennsylvania. HortTechnology, 10(1), 218-221.
Orzolek, M. D. ; Lamont, Jr., William James ; Otjen, L. / 1997 Spring and fall cabbage cultivar trials in Pennsylvania. In: HortTechnology. 2000 ; Vol. 10, No. 1. pp. 218-221.
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Orzolek, MD, Lamont, Jr., WJ & Otjen, L 2000, '1997 Spring and fall cabbage cultivar trials in Pennsylvania', HortTechnology, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 218-221.

1997 Spring and fall cabbage cultivar trials in Pennsylvania. / Orzolek, M. D.; Lamont, Jr., William James; Otjen, L.

In: HortTechnology, Vol. 10, No. 1, 01.01.2000, p. 218-221.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Orzolek MD, Lamont, Jr. WJ, Otjen L. 1997 Spring and fall cabbage cultivar trials in Pennsylvania. HortTechnology. 2000 Jan 1;10(1):218-221.