2,3-Butanedione monoxime cardioplegia: Advantages over hyperkalemia in blood-perfused isolated hearts

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Abstract

Background. 2,3-Butanedione monoxime (BDM) has been shown to possess cardioprotective properties related to the inhibition of cross-bridge force development, the reduction of myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity, and the attenuation of intracellular Ca2+ transients. This study tested the hypothesis that cardiac arrest achieved with BDM would be as effective as that achieved with St. Thomas' solution (StT). Methods. Isolated rabbit hearts, studied on a blood-perfused Langendorff column, underwent 1 hour of ischemia (37°C) and 30 minutes of reperfusion. Cardioplegia was administered every 20 minutes in the form of (1) Krebs-Henseleit solution only (control), (2) 20 mmol/L of BDM, or (3) StT. Recovery of developed pressure, atrioventricular activation times, and tissue water content were measured. Results. Recovery of developed pressure for the control, BDM, and StT groups was 44% ± 3% (p < 0.05 versus BDM and StT), 57% ± 5%, and 62% ± 4%, respectively. Atrioventricular activation times were significantly prolonged in the control group (42 ± 15 ms, p = 0.042) and the StT group (26 ± 9 ms, p = 0.034), but not in the BDM group (14 ± 8 ms). Tissue water content after reperfusion was 80% ± 0.4%, 80% ± 0.2%, and 76% ± 1.0% (p < 0.05 versus control) in the control, StT, and BDM groups, respectively. Conclusions. 2,3- Butanedione monoxime was as effective as StT in protecting the myocardium. Unlike StT, BDM ameliorated myocardial edema and atrioventricular conduction delay after reperfusion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)618-623
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Thoracic Surgery
Volume67
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 1999

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

@article{8bbd9b44417c4ca5ae0b070a037a5dd5,
title = "2,3-Butanedione monoxime cardioplegia: Advantages over hyperkalemia in blood-perfused isolated hearts",
abstract = "Background. 2,3-Butanedione monoxime (BDM) has been shown to possess cardioprotective properties related to the inhibition of cross-bridge force development, the reduction of myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity, and the attenuation of intracellular Ca2+ transients. This study tested the hypothesis that cardiac arrest achieved with BDM would be as effective as that achieved with St. Thomas' solution (StT). Methods. Isolated rabbit hearts, studied on a blood-perfused Langendorff column, underwent 1 hour of ischemia (37°C) and 30 minutes of reperfusion. Cardioplegia was administered every 20 minutes in the form of (1) Krebs-Henseleit solution only (control), (2) 20 mmol/L of BDM, or (3) StT. Recovery of developed pressure, atrioventricular activation times, and tissue water content were measured. Results. Recovery of developed pressure for the control, BDM, and StT groups was 44{\%} ± 3{\%} (p < 0.05 versus BDM and StT), 57{\%} ± 5{\%}, and 62{\%} ± 4{\%}, respectively. Atrioventricular activation times were significantly prolonged in the control group (42 ± 15 ms, p = 0.042) and the StT group (26 ± 9 ms, p = 0.034), but not in the BDM group (14 ± 8 ms). Tissue water content after reperfusion was 80{\%} ± 0.4{\%}, 80{\%} ± 0.2{\%}, and 76{\%} ± 1.0{\%} (p < 0.05 versus control) in the control, StT, and BDM groups, respectively. Conclusions. 2,3- Butanedione monoxime was as effective as StT in protecting the myocardium. Unlike StT, BDM ameliorated myocardial edema and atrioventricular conduction delay after reperfusion.",
author = "Jayawant, {A. Mark} and Stephenson, {Edward R.} and Damiano, {Ralph J.}",
year = "1999",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S0003-4975(98)01273-9",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "67",
pages = "618--623",
journal = "Annals of Thoracic Surgery",
issn = "0003-4975",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "3",

}