24-Month-Old Children With Larger Oral Vocabularies Display Greater Academic and Behavioral Functioning at Kindergarten Entry

Paul Morgan, George Farkas, Marianne Messersmith Hillemeier, Carol Scheffner Hammer, Steve Maczuga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Data were analyzed from a population-based, longitudinal sample of 8,650 U.S. children to (a) identify factors associated with or predictive of oral vocabulary size at 24 months of age and (b) evaluate whether oral vocabulary size is uniquely predictive of academic and behavioral functioning at kindergarten entry. Children from higher socioeconomic status households, females, and those experiencing higher quality parenting had larger oral vocabularies. Children born with very low birth weight or from households where the mother had health problems had smaller oral vocabularies. Even after extensive covariate adjustment, 24-month-old children with larger oral vocabularies displayed greater reading and mathematics achievement, increased behavioral self-regulation, and fewer externalizing and internalizing problem behaviors at kindergarten entry.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1351-1370
Number of pages20
JournalChild development
Volume86
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

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Vocabulary
kindergarten
vocabulary
Social Adjustment
Very Low Birth Weight Infant
Mathematics
Parenting
self-regulation
Social Class
Reading
social status
Mothers
mathematics
Health
health
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

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24-Month-Old Children With Larger Oral Vocabularies Display Greater Academic and Behavioral Functioning at Kindergarten Entry. / Morgan, Paul; Farkas, George; Hillemeier, Marianne Messersmith; Hammer, Carol Scheffner; Maczuga, Steve.

In: Child development, Vol. 86, No. 5, 01.09.2015, p. 1351-1370.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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