25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in African-American and Caucasian/Hispanic subjects with cutaneous lupus erythematosus

A. P. Word, F. Perese, L. C. Tseng, B. Adams-Huet, Nancy Olsen, B. F. Chong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Summary Background Because exposure to ultraviolet radiation accounts for a significant portion of endogenous vitamin D production, subjects with cutaneous lupus (CLE) who practise sun-protective measures are at risk for vitamin D insufficiency. Previous studies have shown light-skinned subjects with CLE to have lower serum 25-hydroxy (25-OH) vitamin D levels than normal controls. Objectives To assess the status of vitamin D insufficiency in dark-skinned individuals with CLE. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study comparing serum 25-OH vitamin D levels in 25 African-American (AA) subjects with CLE and 26 normal AA subjects matched by age, sex and season in Dallas, Texas. A questionnaire on demographics, medical history and lifestyle habits was administered to determine factors potentially affecting vitamin D levels. Findings were contrasted to a similar comparison in 26 Caucasian and Hispanic (C/H) subjects with CLE and 24 normal C/H subjects matched by age, sex and season. Results We found similar mean ± SD 25-OH vitamin D levels in AA subjects with CLE (52·0 ± 18·5 nmol L -1) and normal AA subjects (54·8 ± 21·2 nmol L -1) (P = 0·62). Almost half of AA subjects in both groups were vitamin D insufficient. A larger difference in 25-OH vitamin D levels was found between C/H subjects with CLE (59·4 ± 21·0 nmol L -1) and normal C/H subjects (70·5 ± 27·4 nmol L -1) (P = 0·12). Two-way anova demonstrated that skin colour (AA vs. C/H) had a significant effect on 25-OH vitamin D levels (P = 0·008), although CLE status (CLE vs. normal) did not (P = 0·13). Conclusions Providers are encouraged to address vitamin D insufficiency concerns in all dark-skinned individuals. Future studies should stratify subjects by skin colour in determining differences between subjects with CLE and normal controls.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)372-379
Number of pages8
JournalBritish Journal of Dermatology
Volume166
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 30 2012

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Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus
Hispanic Americans
Vitamin D
African Americans
Skin Pigmentation
25-hydroxyvitamin D
Solar System
Serum
Habits
Life Style

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Word, A. P. ; Perese, F. ; Tseng, L. C. ; Adams-Huet, B. ; Olsen, Nancy ; Chong, B. F. / 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in African-American and Caucasian/Hispanic subjects with cutaneous lupus erythematosus. In: British Journal of Dermatology. 2012 ; Vol. 166, No. 2. pp. 372-379.
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title = "25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in African-American and Caucasian/Hispanic subjects with cutaneous lupus erythematosus",
abstract = "Summary Background Because exposure to ultraviolet radiation accounts for a significant portion of endogenous vitamin D production, subjects with cutaneous lupus (CLE) who practise sun-protective measures are at risk for vitamin D insufficiency. Previous studies have shown light-skinned subjects with CLE to have lower serum 25-hydroxy (25-OH) vitamin D levels than normal controls. Objectives To assess the status of vitamin D insufficiency in dark-skinned individuals with CLE. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study comparing serum 25-OH vitamin D levels in 25 African-American (AA) subjects with CLE and 26 normal AA subjects matched by age, sex and season in Dallas, Texas. A questionnaire on demographics, medical history and lifestyle habits was administered to determine factors potentially affecting vitamin D levels. Findings were contrasted to a similar comparison in 26 Caucasian and Hispanic (C/H) subjects with CLE and 24 normal C/H subjects matched by age, sex and season. Results We found similar mean ± SD 25-OH vitamin D levels in AA subjects with CLE (52·0 ± 18·5 nmol L -1) and normal AA subjects (54·8 ± 21·2 nmol L -1) (P = 0·62). Almost half of AA subjects in both groups were vitamin D insufficient. A larger difference in 25-OH vitamin D levels was found between C/H subjects with CLE (59·4 ± 21·0 nmol L -1) and normal C/H subjects (70·5 ± 27·4 nmol L -1) (P = 0·12). Two-way anova demonstrated that skin colour (AA vs. C/H) had a significant effect on 25-OH vitamin D levels (P = 0·008), although CLE status (CLE vs. normal) did not (P = 0·13). Conclusions Providers are encouraged to address vitamin D insufficiency concerns in all dark-skinned individuals. Future studies should stratify subjects by skin colour in determining differences between subjects with CLE and normal controls.",
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25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in African-American and Caucasian/Hispanic subjects with cutaneous lupus erythematosus. / Word, A. P.; Perese, F.; Tseng, L. C.; Adams-Huet, B.; Olsen, Nancy; Chong, B. F.

In: British Journal of Dermatology, Vol. 166, No. 2, 30.01.2012, p. 372-379.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in African-American and Caucasian/Hispanic subjects with cutaneous lupus erythematosus

AU - Word, A. P.

AU - Perese, F.

AU - Tseng, L. C.

AU - Adams-Huet, B.

AU - Olsen, Nancy

AU - Chong, B. F.

PY - 2012/1/30

Y1 - 2012/1/30

N2 - Summary Background Because exposure to ultraviolet radiation accounts for a significant portion of endogenous vitamin D production, subjects with cutaneous lupus (CLE) who practise sun-protective measures are at risk for vitamin D insufficiency. Previous studies have shown light-skinned subjects with CLE to have lower serum 25-hydroxy (25-OH) vitamin D levels than normal controls. Objectives To assess the status of vitamin D insufficiency in dark-skinned individuals with CLE. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study comparing serum 25-OH vitamin D levels in 25 African-American (AA) subjects with CLE and 26 normal AA subjects matched by age, sex and season in Dallas, Texas. A questionnaire on demographics, medical history and lifestyle habits was administered to determine factors potentially affecting vitamin D levels. Findings were contrasted to a similar comparison in 26 Caucasian and Hispanic (C/H) subjects with CLE and 24 normal C/H subjects matched by age, sex and season. Results We found similar mean ± SD 25-OH vitamin D levels in AA subjects with CLE (52·0 ± 18·5 nmol L -1) and normal AA subjects (54·8 ± 21·2 nmol L -1) (P = 0·62). Almost half of AA subjects in both groups were vitamin D insufficient. A larger difference in 25-OH vitamin D levels was found between C/H subjects with CLE (59·4 ± 21·0 nmol L -1) and normal C/H subjects (70·5 ± 27·4 nmol L -1) (P = 0·12). Two-way anova demonstrated that skin colour (AA vs. C/H) had a significant effect on 25-OH vitamin D levels (P = 0·008), although CLE status (CLE vs. normal) did not (P = 0·13). Conclusions Providers are encouraged to address vitamin D insufficiency concerns in all dark-skinned individuals. Future studies should stratify subjects by skin colour in determining differences between subjects with CLE and normal controls.

AB - Summary Background Because exposure to ultraviolet radiation accounts for a significant portion of endogenous vitamin D production, subjects with cutaneous lupus (CLE) who practise sun-protective measures are at risk for vitamin D insufficiency. Previous studies have shown light-skinned subjects with CLE to have lower serum 25-hydroxy (25-OH) vitamin D levels than normal controls. Objectives To assess the status of vitamin D insufficiency in dark-skinned individuals with CLE. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study comparing serum 25-OH vitamin D levels in 25 African-American (AA) subjects with CLE and 26 normal AA subjects matched by age, sex and season in Dallas, Texas. A questionnaire on demographics, medical history and lifestyle habits was administered to determine factors potentially affecting vitamin D levels. Findings were contrasted to a similar comparison in 26 Caucasian and Hispanic (C/H) subjects with CLE and 24 normal C/H subjects matched by age, sex and season. Results We found similar mean ± SD 25-OH vitamin D levels in AA subjects with CLE (52·0 ± 18·5 nmol L -1) and normal AA subjects (54·8 ± 21·2 nmol L -1) (P = 0·62). Almost half of AA subjects in both groups were vitamin D insufficient. A larger difference in 25-OH vitamin D levels was found between C/H subjects with CLE (59·4 ± 21·0 nmol L -1) and normal C/H subjects (70·5 ± 27·4 nmol L -1) (P = 0·12). Two-way anova demonstrated that skin colour (AA vs. C/H) had a significant effect on 25-OH vitamin D levels (P = 0·008), although CLE status (CLE vs. normal) did not (P = 0·13). Conclusions Providers are encouraged to address vitamin D insufficiency concerns in all dark-skinned individuals. Future studies should stratify subjects by skin colour in determining differences between subjects with CLE and normal controls.

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