2nd rotor hub flow prediction workshop experimental data campaigns & computational analyses

Sven Schmitz Prof, Charles Tierney, Leonard Metkowski, David Reich, Nicholas A. Jaffa, Louis R. Centolanza, Mathew L. Thomas

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

The rotor hub assembly is a primary contributor to rotorcraft parasite drag. Reducing hub drag is one mandatory step to enabling future high-speed conventional and compound rotorcraft. The importance of high-Reynolds number testing of rotor hub flows is emphasized by realizing that high-Reynolds number turbulent coherent structures remain strong for long distances downstream up to the long-age wake where they interact with the empennage and tail. Basic research conducted through the Vertical Lift Research Center of Excellence (VLRCOE) at Penn State’s water tunnel facilities has provided unique high Reynolds-scale data of rotor hub wakes, providing new data for physical understanding and validation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods. A first rotor hub flow prediction workshop was held in June 2016; the present paper focuses on ‘blind comparison results’ between experimental data and CFD analyses that were part of the second rotor hub flow prediction workshop at Penn State VLRCOE in May 2018. The hub workshops are the result of a collaboration between Penn State and Georgia Tech VLRCOEs with support from the National Rotorcraft Technology Center (NRTC), including participation from academia, industry, and government. They are compelling examples of productive exchange between experimental and computational efforts that advance the community’s knowledge about these complex flows that are relevant to efficient and safe vertical lift.

Original languageEnglish (US)
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019
EventVertical Flight Society's 75th Annual Forum and Technology Display - Philadelphia, United States
Duration: May 13 2019May 16 2019

Conference

ConferenceVertical Flight Society's 75th Annual Forum and Technology Display
CountryUnited States
CityPhiladelphia
Period5/13/195/16/19

Fingerprint

Rotors
Drag
Computational fluid dynamics
Reynolds number
Empennages
Tunnels
Testing
Water
Industry

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Aerospace Engineering
  • Control and Systems Engineering

Cite this

Prof, S. S., Tierney, C., Metkowski, L., Reich, D., Jaffa, N. A., Centolanza, L. R., & Thomas, M. L. (2019). 2nd rotor hub flow prediction workshop experimental data campaigns & computational analyses. Paper presented at Vertical Flight Society's 75th Annual Forum and Technology Display, Philadelphia, United States.
Prof, Sven Schmitz ; Tierney, Charles ; Metkowski, Leonard ; Reich, David ; Jaffa, Nicholas A. ; Centolanza, Louis R. ; Thomas, Mathew L. / 2nd rotor hub flow prediction workshop experimental data campaigns & computational analyses. Paper presented at Vertical Flight Society's 75th Annual Forum and Technology Display, Philadelphia, United States.
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Prof, SS, Tierney, C, Metkowski, L, Reich, D, Jaffa, NA, Centolanza, LR & Thomas, ML 2019, '2nd rotor hub flow prediction workshop experimental data campaigns & computational analyses' Paper presented at Vertical Flight Society's 75th Annual Forum and Technology Display, Philadelphia, United States, 5/13/19 - 5/16/19, .

2nd rotor hub flow prediction workshop experimental data campaigns & computational analyses. / Prof, Sven Schmitz; Tierney, Charles; Metkowski, Leonard; Reich, David; Jaffa, Nicholas A.; Centolanza, Louis R.; Thomas, Mathew L.

2019. Paper presented at Vertical Flight Society's 75th Annual Forum and Technology Display, Philadelphia, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

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Prof SS, Tierney C, Metkowski L, Reich D, Jaffa NA, Centolanza LR et al. 2nd rotor hub flow prediction workshop experimental data campaigns & computational analyses. 2019. Paper presented at Vertical Flight Society's 75th Annual Forum and Technology Display, Philadelphia, United States.