3D path planning and extension for endoscopic guidance

Jason D. Gibbs, William Evan Higgins

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Physicians use endoscopic procedures to diagnose and treat a variety of medical conditions. For example, bronchoscopy is often performed to diagnose lung cancer. The current practice for planning endoscopic procedures requires the physician to manually scroll through the slices of a three-dimensional (3D) medical image. When doing this scrolling, the physician must perform 3D mental reconstruction of the endoscopic route to reach a specific diagnostic region of interest (ROI). Unfortunately, in the case of complex branching structures such as the airway tree, ROIs are often situated several generations away from the organ's origin. Existing image-analysis methods can help define possible endoscopic navigation paths, but they do not provide specific routes for reaching a given ROI. We have developed an automated method to find a specific route to reach an ROI. Given a 3D medical image, our method takes as inputs: (1) pre-defined ROIs; (2) a segmentation of the branching organ through which the endoscopic device will navigate; and (3) centerlines (paths) through the segmented organ. We use existing methods for branching-organ segmentation and centerline extraction. Our method then (1) identifies the closest paths (routes) to the ROI; and (2) if necessary, performs a directed search for the organ of interest, extending the existing paths to complete a route. Results from human 3D computed tomography chest images illustrate the efficacy of the method.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMedical Imaging 2007
Subtitle of host publicationVisualization and Image-Guided Procedures
EditionPART 2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 15 2007
EventMedical Imaging 2007: Visualization and Image-Guided Procedures - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: Feb 18 2007Feb 20 2007

Publication series

NameProgress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE
NumberPART 2
Volume6509
ISSN (Print)1605-7422

Other

OtherMedical Imaging 2007: Visualization and Image-Guided Procedures
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period2/18/072/20/07

Fingerprint

trajectory planning
Motion planning
organs
routes
physicians
Image analysis
Tomography
Navigation
Planning
Physicians
chest
navigation
image analysis
lungs
planning
tomography
cancer
Bronchoscopy
Lung Neoplasms
Thorax

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Biomaterials
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Gibbs, J. D., & Higgins, W. E. (2007). 3D path planning and extension for endoscopic guidance. In Medical Imaging 2007: Visualization and Image-Guided Procedures (PART 2 ed.). [65091K] (Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE; Vol. 6509, No. PART 2). https://doi.org/10.1117/12.708513
Gibbs, Jason D. ; Higgins, William Evan. / 3D path planning and extension for endoscopic guidance. Medical Imaging 2007: Visualization and Image-Guided Procedures. PART 2. ed. 2007. (Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE; PART 2).
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Gibbs, JD & Higgins, WE 2007, 3D path planning and extension for endoscopic guidance. in Medical Imaging 2007: Visualization and Image-Guided Procedures. PART 2 edn, 65091K, Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE, no. PART 2, vol. 6509, Medical Imaging 2007: Visualization and Image-Guided Procedures, San Diego, CA, United States, 2/18/07. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.708513

3D path planning and extension for endoscopic guidance. / Gibbs, Jason D.; Higgins, William Evan.

Medical Imaging 2007: Visualization and Image-Guided Procedures. PART 2. ed. 2007. 65091K (Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE; Vol. 6509, No. PART 2).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Gibbs JD, Higgins WE. 3D path planning and extension for endoscopic guidance. In Medical Imaging 2007: Visualization and Image-Guided Procedures. PART 2 ed. 2007. 65091K. (Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE; PART 2). https://doi.org/10.1117/12.708513