“A Bone of Contention…”: Perceived Barriers and Situational Dependencies to Food Preferences of Nursing Home Residents

Chelsea N. Goldstein, Katherine M. Abbott, Lauren R. Bangerter, Amy Kotterman, Kimberly Van Haitsma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study investigated barriers to fulfilling food preferences from nursing home (NH) residents’ perspectives, and the reasons preferences changed (situational dependencies). Interviews were completed with 255 residents in 28 NHs across greater Philadelphia, PA using six food items from the Preferences for Everyday Living Inventory-NH (PELI-NH). Participants were predominantly white (77%), female (67.8%), and widowed (44%) with high school educations (48%). Content analysis was used to identify n = 386 barriers and n = 57 situational dependencies. Participants reported provider policies and staff proficiency as environmental barriers to preference fulfillment regarding what, when, and where to eat. Perceived health and personal resources were barriers to obtaining snacks, take-out, and dining out. Situational dependencies resulted from residents’ perceived health and quality of family relationships. Results have implications for providers to centralize food preference fulfillment in care planning, and to use food preferences to address dining quality concerns.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)277-296
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Nutrition in Gerontology and Geriatrics
Volume38
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 3 2019

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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