A case of cutaneous endometriosis following vulvar injury

Danielle B. Hazard, Gerald Harkins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Cutaneous endometriosis of the vulva following traumatic injury is rare. Case: A 15-year-old presented to the emergency department complaining of vulvar swelling with painful papules and URI symptoms, 11 months after suffering a vulvar abrasion. She was admitted to the hospital for pain control and empiric antiviral therapy for a suspected herpes outbreak, although final herpes simplex virus (HSV) cultures were negative. She continued to experience similar episodic vulvar symptoms, and biopsy and surgical resection of the lesions revealed cutaneous endometriosis. Conclusion: Although the vulva is a rare site for endometriosis, it should always remain a differential diagnosis when painful vulvar lesions are present.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)171-173
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Endometriosis
Volume3
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011

Fingerprint

Endometriosis
Vulva
Skin
Wounds and Injuries
Simplexvirus
Antiviral Agents
Disease Outbreaks
Hospital Emergency Service
Differential Diagnosis
Biopsy
Pain
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

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A case of cutaneous endometriosis following vulvar injury. / Hazard, Danielle B.; Harkins, Gerald.

In: Journal of Endometriosis, Vol. 3, No. 3, 2011, p. 171-173.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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