A case study of CO2, CO and particles content evolution in the suburban atmospheric boundary layer using a 2-μm doppler DIAL, a 1-μm backscatter lidar and an array of in-situ sensors

Fabien Gibert, Ièrne Xuéref-Rémy, Lilian Joly, Martina Schmidt, Juan Cuesta, Kenneth J. Davis, Michel Ramonet, Pierre H. Flamant, Bertrand Parvitte, Virginie Zéninari

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Abstract

A network of remote and in-situ sensors was deployed in a Paris suburb in order to evaluate the mesoscale evolution of the daily cycle of CO2 and related tracers in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) and its relation to ABL dynamics and nearby natural and anthropogenic sources and sinks. A 2-μm heterodyne Doppler differential absorption lidar, which combines measurements of, (1) structure of the atmosphere, (2) radial velocity, and (3) CO2 differential absorption was a particularly unique element of the observational array. We analyse the differences in the diurnal cycle of CO, CO2, lidar reflectivity (a proxy for aerosol content) and H2O using the lidar, airborne measurements in the free troposphere and ground-based measurements made at two sites located few kilometres apart. We demonstrate that vertical mixing dominates the early morning drawdown of CO and aerosol content trapped in the former nocturnal layer but not the H2O and CO2 mixing ratio variations. Surface fluxes, vertical mixing and advection all contribute to the ABL CO2 mixing ratio decrease during the morning transition, with the relative importance depending on the rate and timing of ABL rise. We also show evidence that when the ABL is stable, small-scale (0.1-km vertical and 1-km horizontal) gradients of CO2 and CO are large. The results illustrate the complexity of inferring surface fluxes of CO2 from atmospheric budgets in the stable boundary layer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)381-401
Number of pages21
JournalBoundary-Layer Meteorology
Volume128
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Atmospheric Science

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