A Comparison of DSM-II and DSM-III in the Diagnosis of Childhood Psychiatric Disorders: IV. Difficulties in Use, Global Comparison, and Conclusions

Dennis P. Cantwell, Richard Mattison, Andrew T. Russell, Lois Will

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

A good classification system, in addition to being reliable, must be easy to use. This report examines the difficulties raters encountered in using DSM-III to diagnose 24 child and adolescent psychiatric case histories. Overall, the raters reported few difficulties. They consistently preferred DSM-III over DSM-II as the more useful diagnostic system. In summarizing the results of the entire four-part study, we conclude that DSM-III, with additional refinement, gives promise of being a very usable and reliable classification system for the diagnosis of psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1227-1228
Number of pages2
JournalArchives of General Psychiatry
Volume36
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1979

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A Comparison of DSM-II and DSM-III in the Diagnosis of Childhood Psychiatric Disorders: IV. Difficulties in Use, Global Comparison, and Conclusions'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this