A Comparison of Learning Styles and Demographic Characteristics of Students Enrolled in Selected Animal Science Courses

T. S. Hoover, T. T. Marshall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Learning style is the method an individual uses to concentrate and to process and retain new information. This developmental set of characteristics can make identical instruction effective for some learners and ineffective for others. Even though learners are capable of mastering the identical information or skills, if they are taught through methods that complement their preferred learning style, analytical and global learners have different environmental and physiological needs. An important relationship between learning style and instruction is that individuals are likely to teach the way they prefer to learn. The objectives of this study were to identify learning styles of students enrolled in selected animal science courses. The majority (58%) of students enrolled in selected courses preferred a field-indepen- dent learning style (analytical). With respect to gender and learning style, there was no difference between males and females. Classification of high school demographics showed students from rural areas preferred a field-dependent learning style (global) and students from suburban or urban areas were more likely to prefer a field-independent style. There was a difference in the preferred learning style of animal science faculty (field-dependent) and those students who declared their majors as animal science and preveterinary medicine (field-independent). The inverse relationship was found between dairy/poultry science faculty and students. Faculty should be aware of their own learning style and the learning styles of their students so they may facilitate learning for all students.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3169-3173
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of animal science
Volume76
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Genetics

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