A comparison of the experiences of dominant and minority group members during an intergroup encounter

Laur'i L. Hyers, Janet K. Swim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

56 Scopus citations

Abstract

Focusing on the immediate effects of the intergroup situation on participants' anxiety, affect, cognitions, and task involvement, comparisons were made between the experiences of minority group members (African-Americans) and dominant group members (European-Americans) during intergroup encounters of varied group composition (i.e. participants held either solo or non-solo status). The group composition manipulation had very little effect overall. However, regardless of group composition, European-American participants were more adversely affected than African-American participants, as evidenced by cognitive and task involvement variables. African-American participants' experiences may have been less adverse due to their greater intergroup experience and more effective use of intergroup coping strategies such as mindfulness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)143-163
Number of pages21
JournalGroup Processes and Intergroup Relations
Volume1
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Cultural Studies
  • Communication
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science

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