A comprehensive analysis of the mortality experience of hispanic subgroups in the United States: Variation by age, country of origin, and nativity

Andrew Fenelon, Juanita J. Chinn, Robert N. Anderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although those identifying as “Hispanic or Latino” experience lower adult mortality than the more socioeconomically advantaged non-Hispanic white population, the ethnic category Hispanic conceals variation by country of origin, nativity, age, and immigration experience. The current analysis examines adult mortality differentials among 12 Hispanic subgroups by region of origin and nativity, and non-Hispanic whites, adjusting for socioeconomic and demographic characteristics. We use the National Health Interview Survey Linked Mortality Files pooled 1990–2009 to obtain sufficient sample of each subgroup to calculate mortality estimates by sex and age group (25–64, 65+). Among adults aged 65 and over, all foreign born subgroups have an advantage over non-Hispanic whites, and many USB subgroups exhibit an advantage in the adjusted model. Foreign-born Dominicans, Central/South Americans, and other Hispanics exhibit consistent advantages across models for both men and women, aged 25–64 and 65 and over, and both unadjusted and adjusted for socioeconomic covariates. Both US-born and foreign-born Mexicans between ages 25 and 64 have mortality disadvantaged relative to non-Hispanic whites, while older Mexicans exhibit clear advantages. Our results complicate the traditional formulation of the Hispanic Paradox and cast doubt on the singularity of the mortality experience of those of Hispanic origin.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)245-254
Number of pages10
JournalSSM - Population Health
Volume3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

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country of origin
Hispanic Americans
mortality
Mortality
experience
Emigration and Immigration
Vulnerable Populations
Health Surveys
age group
immigration
Age Groups
Demography
Interviews
interview
health
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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A comprehensive analysis of the mortality experience of hispanic subgroups in the United States : Variation by age, country of origin, and nativity. / Fenelon, Andrew; Chinn, Juanita J.; Anderson, Robert N.

In: SSM - Population Health, Vol. 3, 01.12.2017, p. 245-254.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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