A computational model for prediction of pilot manual control behavior in air transport concepts of operation

David C. Dickson, Amy Pritchett, Anil E. Bozan

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper describes a computational model of pilot manual control of a transport aircraft in both problematic simple maneuvers and realistic, complex concepts of operation. In this model, the pilot is represented by the combination of an adaptive controller, and a state estimator informed by pilot expectation defined by a previously-developed model-based observer (MBO) that simulates vestibular and visual feedback. As a demonstration, this model will be used to examine both problematic simple maneuvers and NextGen operations that apply new methods of air traffic management during optimized profile descent (OPD). The NextGen operations will specifically examine aspects of air traffic control clearances and flight conditions that might be precursors to flight upset. For purposes of comparison, this work will contrast a representation of the pilot as a manual controller against a simulated autoflight system. Both controllers will apply a model reference adaptive controller (MRAC), with the difference between the two comprising the reference model within the MRAC. Specifically, the manual controller will use the classical crossover model as its reference model on all control loops, whereas the autoflight system will use first-order and second-order reference models. Additionally, this work will employ these models in the cases of pilot feedback being represented as either a.) “perfect” and full-state, and b.) imperfect, with pilot distractions being simulated via the MBO. These models will then be applied in a.) simple, potentially spatial disorientation (SD)-inducing maneuvers, and b.) simulations of OPD with the following succeeding levels of complexity: i.) Nominal descent, ii.) Descent with “problematic” air traffic controller commands, and iii.) Extreme variants of descent with “problematic” air traffic controller commands, where the total energy state of the aircraft varies significantly over the course of the simulation run.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAIAA Modeling and Simulation Technologies Conference
PublisherAmerican Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc, AIAA
ISBN (Print)9781624103872
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016
EventAIAA Modeling and Simulation Technologies Conference, 2016 - San Diego, United States
Duration: Jan 4 2016Jan 8 2016

Publication series

NameAIAA Modeling and Simulation Technologies Conference

Other

OtherAIAA Modeling and Simulation Technologies Conference, 2016
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego
Period1/4/161/8/16

Fingerprint

Manual control
Computational Model
Reference Model
Controller
Descent
Prediction
Air
Controllers
Aircraft
Observer
Traffic
Model-based
Air Traffic Management
Air Traffic Control
Second-order Model
Model
Concepts
Clearance
Imperfect
Precursor

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Aerospace Engineering
  • Modeling and Simulation

Cite this

Dickson, D. C., Pritchett, A., & Bozan, A. E. (2016). A computational model for prediction of pilot manual control behavior in air transport concepts of operation. In AIAA Modeling and Simulation Technologies Conference (AIAA Modeling and Simulation Technologies Conference). American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc, AIAA.
Dickson, David C. ; Pritchett, Amy ; Bozan, Anil E. / A computational model for prediction of pilot manual control behavior in air transport concepts of operation. AIAA Modeling and Simulation Technologies Conference. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc, AIAA, 2016. (AIAA Modeling and Simulation Technologies Conference).
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Dickson, DC, Pritchett, A & Bozan, AE 2016, A computational model for prediction of pilot manual control behavior in air transport concepts of operation. in AIAA Modeling and Simulation Technologies Conference. AIAA Modeling and Simulation Technologies Conference, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc, AIAA, AIAA Modeling and Simulation Technologies Conference, 2016, San Diego, United States, 1/4/16.

A computational model for prediction of pilot manual control behavior in air transport concepts of operation. / Dickson, David C.; Pritchett, Amy; Bozan, Anil E.

AIAA Modeling and Simulation Technologies Conference. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc, AIAA, 2016. (AIAA Modeling and Simulation Technologies Conference).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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N2 - This paper describes a computational model of pilot manual control of a transport aircraft in both problematic simple maneuvers and realistic, complex concepts of operation. In this model, the pilot is represented by the combination of an adaptive controller, and a state estimator informed by pilot expectation defined by a previously-developed model-based observer (MBO) that simulates vestibular and visual feedback. As a demonstration, this model will be used to examine both problematic simple maneuvers and NextGen operations that apply new methods of air traffic management during optimized profile descent (OPD). The NextGen operations will specifically examine aspects of air traffic control clearances and flight conditions that might be precursors to flight upset. For purposes of comparison, this work will contrast a representation of the pilot as a manual controller against a simulated autoflight system. Both controllers will apply a model reference adaptive controller (MRAC), with the difference between the two comprising the reference model within the MRAC. Specifically, the manual controller will use the classical crossover model as its reference model on all control loops, whereas the autoflight system will use first-order and second-order reference models. Additionally, this work will employ these models in the cases of pilot feedback being represented as either a.) “perfect” and full-state, and b.) imperfect, with pilot distractions being simulated via the MBO. These models will then be applied in a.) simple, potentially spatial disorientation (SD)-inducing maneuvers, and b.) simulations of OPD with the following succeeding levels of complexity: i.) Nominal descent, ii.) Descent with “problematic” air traffic controller commands, and iii.) Extreme variants of descent with “problematic” air traffic controller commands, where the total energy state of the aircraft varies significantly over the course of the simulation run.

AB - This paper describes a computational model of pilot manual control of a transport aircraft in both problematic simple maneuvers and realistic, complex concepts of operation. In this model, the pilot is represented by the combination of an adaptive controller, and a state estimator informed by pilot expectation defined by a previously-developed model-based observer (MBO) that simulates vestibular and visual feedback. As a demonstration, this model will be used to examine both problematic simple maneuvers and NextGen operations that apply new methods of air traffic management during optimized profile descent (OPD). The NextGen operations will specifically examine aspects of air traffic control clearances and flight conditions that might be precursors to flight upset. For purposes of comparison, this work will contrast a representation of the pilot as a manual controller against a simulated autoflight system. Both controllers will apply a model reference adaptive controller (MRAC), with the difference between the two comprising the reference model within the MRAC. Specifically, the manual controller will use the classical crossover model as its reference model on all control loops, whereas the autoflight system will use first-order and second-order reference models. Additionally, this work will employ these models in the cases of pilot feedback being represented as either a.) “perfect” and full-state, and b.) imperfect, with pilot distractions being simulated via the MBO. These models will then be applied in a.) simple, potentially spatial disorientation (SD)-inducing maneuvers, and b.) simulations of OPD with the following succeeding levels of complexity: i.) Nominal descent, ii.) Descent with “problematic” air traffic controller commands, and iii.) Extreme variants of descent with “problematic” air traffic controller commands, where the total energy state of the aircraft varies significantly over the course of the simulation run.

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M3 - Conference contribution

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Dickson DC, Pritchett A, Bozan AE. A computational model for prediction of pilot manual control behavior in air transport concepts of operation. In AIAA Modeling and Simulation Technologies Conference. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc, AIAA. 2016. (AIAA Modeling and Simulation Technologies Conference).