A conceptual framework for scaffolding III-structured problem-solving processes using question prompts and peer interactions

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Abstract

We present a conceptual framework for scaffolding ill-structured problem-solving processes using question prompts and peer interactions. We first examine the characteristics and processes of ill-structured problem solving, namely, problem representation, generating solutions, making justifications, and monitoring and evaluation. Then, we analyze each of the problem-solving processes with regard to its cognitive and metacognitive requirements, the issues and learning problems that might be encountered by students during each process, and the respective role of question prompts and peer interactions in scaffolding each process. Next, we discuss the role of the teacher in relation to the use of the two scaffolding techniques, and their limitations. Last, we discuss implications for instructional design by suggesting some specific guidelines, and made recommendations for future research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5-22
Number of pages18
JournalEducational Technology Research and Development
Volume52
Issue number2
StatePublished - Aug 20 2004

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interaction
monitoring
teacher
evaluation
learning
student

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education

Cite this

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title = "A conceptual framework for scaffolding III-structured problem-solving processes using question prompts and peer interactions",
abstract = "We present a conceptual framework for scaffolding ill-structured problem-solving processes using question prompts and peer interactions. We first examine the characteristics and processes of ill-structured problem solving, namely, problem representation, generating solutions, making justifications, and monitoring and evaluation. Then, we analyze each of the problem-solving processes with regard to its cognitive and metacognitive requirements, the issues and learning problems that might be encountered by students during each process, and the respective role of question prompts and peer interactions in scaffolding each process. Next, we discuss the role of the teacher in relation to the use of the two scaffolding techniques, and their limitations. Last, we discuss implications for instructional design by suggesting some specific guidelines, and made recommendations for future research.",
author = "Xun Ge and Land, {Susan Mary}",
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N2 - We present a conceptual framework for scaffolding ill-structured problem-solving processes using question prompts and peer interactions. We first examine the characteristics and processes of ill-structured problem solving, namely, problem representation, generating solutions, making justifications, and monitoring and evaluation. Then, we analyze each of the problem-solving processes with regard to its cognitive and metacognitive requirements, the issues and learning problems that might be encountered by students during each process, and the respective role of question prompts and peer interactions in scaffolding each process. Next, we discuss the role of the teacher in relation to the use of the two scaffolding techniques, and their limitations. Last, we discuss implications for instructional design by suggesting some specific guidelines, and made recommendations for future research.

AB - We present a conceptual framework for scaffolding ill-structured problem-solving processes using question prompts and peer interactions. We first examine the characteristics and processes of ill-structured problem solving, namely, problem representation, generating solutions, making justifications, and monitoring and evaluation. Then, we analyze each of the problem-solving processes with regard to its cognitive and metacognitive requirements, the issues and learning problems that might be encountered by students during each process, and the respective role of question prompts and peer interactions in scaffolding each process. Next, we discuss the role of the teacher in relation to the use of the two scaffolding techniques, and their limitations. Last, we discuss implications for instructional design by suggesting some specific guidelines, and made recommendations for future research.

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