A connection between colony biomass and death in Caribbean reef-building corals

Daniel J. Thornhill, Randi D. Rotjan, Brian D. Todd, Geoff C. Chilcoat, Roberto Iglesias-Prieto, Dustin W. Kemp, Todd C. Lajeunesse, Jennifer Mc Cabe Reynolds, Gregory W. Schmidt, Thomas Shannon, Mark E. Warner, William K. Fitt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Increased sea-surface temperatures linked to warming climate threaten coral reef ecosystems globally. To better understand how corals and their endosymbiotic dinoflagellates (Symbiodinium spp.) respond to environmental change, tissue biomass and Symbiodinium density of seven coral species were measured on various reefs approximately every four months for up to thirteen years in the Upper Florida Keys, United States (1994-2007), eleven years in the Exuma Cays, Bahamas (1995-2006), and four years in Puerto Morelos, Mexico (2003-2007). For six out of seven coral species, tissue biomass correlated with Symbiodinium density. Within a particular coral species, tissue biomasses and Symbiodinium densities varied regionally according to the following trends: Mexico≥Florida Keys≥Bahamas. Average tissue biomasses and symbiont cell densities were generally higher in shallow habitats (1-4 m) compared to deeper-dwelling conspecifics (12-15 m). Most colonies that were sampled displayed seasonal fluctuations in biomass and endosymbiont density related to annual temperature variations. During the bleaching episodes of 1998 and 2005, five out of seven species that were exposed to unusually high temperatures exhibited significant decreases in symbiotic algae that, in certain cases, preceded further decreases in tissue biomass. Following bleaching, Montastraea spp. colonies with low relative biomass levels died, whereas colonies with higher biomass levels survived. Bleaching- or disease-associated mortality was also observed in Acropora cervicornis colonies; compared to A. palmata, all A. cervicornis colonies experienced low biomass values. Such patterns suggest that Montastraea spp. and possibly other coral species with relatively low biomass experience increased susceptibility to death following bleaching or other stressors than do conspecifics with higher tissue biomass levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere29535
JournalPLoS One
Volume6
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 22 2011

Fingerprint

Coral Reefs
Reefs
Biomass
corals
reefs
death
Anthozoa
biomass
Symbiodinium
Tissue
Bleaching
bleaching
algae
Temperature
Ecosystem
Bahamas
Dinoflagellida
endosymbionts
Algae
Mexico

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Thornhill, D. J., Rotjan, R. D., Todd, B. D., Chilcoat, G. C., Iglesias-Prieto, R., Kemp, D. W., ... Fitt, W. K. (2011). A connection between colony biomass and death in Caribbean reef-building corals. PLoS One, 6(12), [e29535]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0029535
Thornhill, Daniel J. ; Rotjan, Randi D. ; Todd, Brian D. ; Chilcoat, Geoff C. ; Iglesias-Prieto, Roberto ; Kemp, Dustin W. ; Lajeunesse, Todd C. ; Reynolds, Jennifer Mc Cabe ; Schmidt, Gregory W. ; Shannon, Thomas ; Warner, Mark E. ; Fitt, William K. / A connection between colony biomass and death in Caribbean reef-building corals. In: PLoS One. 2011 ; Vol. 6, No. 12.
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abstract = "Increased sea-surface temperatures linked to warming climate threaten coral reef ecosystems globally. To better understand how corals and their endosymbiotic dinoflagellates (Symbiodinium spp.) respond to environmental change, tissue biomass and Symbiodinium density of seven coral species were measured on various reefs approximately every four months for up to thirteen years in the Upper Florida Keys, United States (1994-2007), eleven years in the Exuma Cays, Bahamas (1995-2006), and four years in Puerto Morelos, Mexico (2003-2007). For six out of seven coral species, tissue biomass correlated with Symbiodinium density. Within a particular coral species, tissue biomasses and Symbiodinium densities varied regionally according to the following trends: Mexico≥Florida Keys≥Bahamas. Average tissue biomasses and symbiont cell densities were generally higher in shallow habitats (1-4 m) compared to deeper-dwelling conspecifics (12-15 m). Most colonies that were sampled displayed seasonal fluctuations in biomass and endosymbiont density related to annual temperature variations. During the bleaching episodes of 1998 and 2005, five out of seven species that were exposed to unusually high temperatures exhibited significant decreases in symbiotic algae that, in certain cases, preceded further decreases in tissue biomass. Following bleaching, Montastraea spp. colonies with low relative biomass levels died, whereas colonies with higher biomass levels survived. Bleaching- or disease-associated mortality was also observed in Acropora cervicornis colonies; compared to A. palmata, all A. cervicornis colonies experienced low biomass values. Such patterns suggest that Montastraea spp. and possibly other coral species with relatively low biomass experience increased susceptibility to death following bleaching or other stressors than do conspecifics with higher tissue biomass levels.",
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Thornhill, DJ, Rotjan, RD, Todd, BD, Chilcoat, GC, Iglesias-Prieto, R, Kemp, DW, Lajeunesse, TC, Reynolds, JMC, Schmidt, GW, Shannon, T, Warner, ME & Fitt, WK 2011, 'A connection between colony biomass and death in Caribbean reef-building corals', PLoS One, vol. 6, no. 12, e29535. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0029535

A connection between colony biomass and death in Caribbean reef-building corals. / Thornhill, Daniel J.; Rotjan, Randi D.; Todd, Brian D.; Chilcoat, Geoff C.; Iglesias-Prieto, Roberto; Kemp, Dustin W.; Lajeunesse, Todd C.; Reynolds, Jennifer Mc Cabe; Schmidt, Gregory W.; Shannon, Thomas; Warner, Mark E.; Fitt, William K.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 6, No. 12, e29535, 22.12.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Thornhill, Daniel J.

AU - Rotjan, Randi D.

AU - Todd, Brian D.

AU - Chilcoat, Geoff C.

AU - Iglesias-Prieto, Roberto

AU - Kemp, Dustin W.

AU - Lajeunesse, Todd C.

AU - Reynolds, Jennifer Mc Cabe

AU - Schmidt, Gregory W.

AU - Shannon, Thomas

AU - Warner, Mark E.

AU - Fitt, William K.

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