A content analysis from a US statewide survey of memorable healthcare decisions for individuals with intellectual disability

Kathleen M. Fisher, Michael Green, Fredrick K. Orkin, Vernon Chinchilli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Little is known about surrogate healthcare decision-making for individuals with intellectual disability (ID). This study examined healthcare decision-making by residential-agency directors to learn their process and the extent to which the individual is included. Method: Content analysis of qualitative data from a mailed survey of residential-agency directors in a large US northeastern state. Results: Narrative comments of 102 directors (65% of respondents) are reported. Three themes emerged: (a) Identifying someone else's "best interest" is challenging; (b) Perceptions of the healthcare community, especially related to quality of life, can influence care provided; and (c) Surrogate decision-making is a team effort. Conclusions: With knowledge of how decisions are made, the healthcare community can better interact with the complex array of service agencies and persons who determine care for this vulnerable population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)258-265
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability
Volume34
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2009

Fingerprint

Health Care Surveys
Intellectual Disability
director
content analysis
disability
Delivery of Health Care
decision making
Decision Making
community
quality of life
Vulnerable Populations
narrative
human being
Quality of Life
Healthcare
Content Analysis
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

@article{5b7113a4c6e8420aa08539b4ebf87fcf,
title = "A content analysis from a US statewide survey of memorable healthcare decisions for individuals with intellectual disability",
abstract = "Background: Little is known about surrogate healthcare decision-making for individuals with intellectual disability (ID). This study examined healthcare decision-making by residential-agency directors to learn their process and the extent to which the individual is included. Method: Content analysis of qualitative data from a mailed survey of residential-agency directors in a large US northeastern state. Results: Narrative comments of 102 directors (65{\%} of respondents) are reported. Three themes emerged: (a) Identifying someone else's {"}best interest{"} is challenging; (b) Perceptions of the healthcare community, especially related to quality of life, can influence care provided; and (c) Surrogate decision-making is a team effort. Conclusions: With knowledge of how decisions are made, the healthcare community can better interact with the complex array of service agencies and persons who determine care for this vulnerable population.",
author = "Fisher, {Kathleen M.} and Michael Green and Orkin, {Fredrick K.} and Vernon Chinchilli",
year = "2009",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/13668250903083332",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "34",
pages = "258--265",
journal = "Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability",
issn = "1366-8250",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A content analysis from a US statewide survey of memorable healthcare decisions for individuals with intellectual disability

AU - Fisher, Kathleen M.

AU - Green, Michael

AU - Orkin, Fredrick K.

AU - Chinchilli, Vernon

PY - 2009/9/1

Y1 - 2009/9/1

N2 - Background: Little is known about surrogate healthcare decision-making for individuals with intellectual disability (ID). This study examined healthcare decision-making by residential-agency directors to learn their process and the extent to which the individual is included. Method: Content analysis of qualitative data from a mailed survey of residential-agency directors in a large US northeastern state. Results: Narrative comments of 102 directors (65% of respondents) are reported. Three themes emerged: (a) Identifying someone else's "best interest" is challenging; (b) Perceptions of the healthcare community, especially related to quality of life, can influence care provided; and (c) Surrogate decision-making is a team effort. Conclusions: With knowledge of how decisions are made, the healthcare community can better interact with the complex array of service agencies and persons who determine care for this vulnerable population.

AB - Background: Little is known about surrogate healthcare decision-making for individuals with intellectual disability (ID). This study examined healthcare decision-making by residential-agency directors to learn their process and the extent to which the individual is included. Method: Content analysis of qualitative data from a mailed survey of residential-agency directors in a large US northeastern state. Results: Narrative comments of 102 directors (65% of respondents) are reported. Three themes emerged: (a) Identifying someone else's "best interest" is challenging; (b) Perceptions of the healthcare community, especially related to quality of life, can influence care provided; and (c) Surrogate decision-making is a team effort. Conclusions: With knowledge of how decisions are made, the healthcare community can better interact with the complex array of service agencies and persons who determine care for this vulnerable population.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=69049084823&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=69049084823&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/13668250903083332

DO - 10.1080/13668250903083332

M3 - Article

VL - 34

SP - 258

EP - 265

JO - Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability

JF - Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability

SN - 1366-8250

IS - 3

ER -