A critical assessment of nanometer-scale zirconia green body formation by pressure filtration and uniaxial compaction

Christopher J. Szepesi, Jerome Cantonnet, Robert Allen Kimel, James Hansell Adair

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Green body formation with nanoscale powders poses unique challenges. This report discusses two specific green-forming procedures: pressure filtration and dry-powder compaction. Green compacts were formed from suspensions of hydrothermally derived YTZP prepared in the presence of bicine, which acts as a protective colloid and dispersant. However, due to capillary forces encountered when drying filter-pressed, nanoporous compacts, green bodies could not be recovered intact. Dry-powder compaction is explored as an alternative green-forming technique. The effect of powder recovery procedure on compaction behavior and microstructural homogeneity are discussed. Strong capillary forces also act on nanoparticles during pan-drying, yielding high-strength aggregates which are difficult to deform during compaction. Drying particles from a lower surface tension liquid, such as ethanol, is found to have little effect on aggregate strength. Freeze-drying is demonstrated as the preferred powder recovery technique since particles are kept in a dispersed state during drying, and compression of agglomerates by capillary forces is avoided. Compaction behavior of recovered powders is examined with a model that describes powder consolidation as an activated process. From this analysis, it is demonstrated that granule deformation and rearrangement contribute equally to the compaction process in pan-dried nanopowders. It is also shown that primary particle rearrangement accounts for the majority of compaction in freeze-dried nanopowders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4200-4206
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Ceramic Society
Volume94
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2011

Fingerprint

Zirconia
Powders
Compaction
Drying
Protective colloids
Recovery
zirconium oxide
Consolidation
Surface tension
Suspensions
Ethanol
Nanoparticles
Liquids

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Materials Chemistry

Cite this

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abstract = "Green body formation with nanoscale powders poses unique challenges. This report discusses two specific green-forming procedures: pressure filtration and dry-powder compaction. Green compacts were formed from suspensions of hydrothermally derived YTZP prepared in the presence of bicine, which acts as a protective colloid and dispersant. However, due to capillary forces encountered when drying filter-pressed, nanoporous compacts, green bodies could not be recovered intact. Dry-powder compaction is explored as an alternative green-forming technique. The effect of powder recovery procedure on compaction behavior and microstructural homogeneity are discussed. Strong capillary forces also act on nanoparticles during pan-drying, yielding high-strength aggregates which are difficult to deform during compaction. Drying particles from a lower surface tension liquid, such as ethanol, is found to have little effect on aggregate strength. Freeze-drying is demonstrated as the preferred powder recovery technique since particles are kept in a dispersed state during drying, and compression of agglomerates by capillary forces is avoided. Compaction behavior of recovered powders is examined with a model that describes powder consolidation as an activated process. From this analysis, it is demonstrated that granule deformation and rearrangement contribute equally to the compaction process in pan-dried nanopowders. It is also shown that primary particle rearrangement accounts for the majority of compaction in freeze-dried nanopowders.",
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A critical assessment of nanometer-scale zirconia green body formation by pressure filtration and uniaxial compaction. / Szepesi, Christopher J.; Cantonnet, Jerome; Kimel, Robert Allen; Adair, James Hansell.

In: Journal of the American Ceramic Society, Vol. 94, No. 12, 12.2011, p. 4200-4206.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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