A Delphi study of the subjective "rush" experience: Understanding the perspective of the injecting drug user to enhance quality of drug intervention

Hannah K. Green, Edward Smith, Ria Poole, Laura Skuse, Pamela Roberts, Jeff Champney-Smith, Alyson J. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The objective of this study was to explore what injecting drug users mean by the "rush," their subjective experiences of it, and possible factors that may affect the experience. Seecof and Tennant (1986) found the "rush" to be likened to sexual orgasm; however, other studies attempting to pinpoint the "rush" have revealed a wide range of subjective sensations and emotions that bear no link to sexual orgasm (Riddall, 1970). As such, it remains unclear what both drug users and workers mean when they refer to the "rush" and whether the experience differs between users. An opportunity sample of 25 participants (20 males and 5 females) were recruited from the client base at the Cardiff Community Addictions Unit. A qualitative design was implemented using the Delphi technique and content analysis, with two rounds of questionnaires being administered. Moderately strong consensuses were found for various aspects of the rush and factors affecting the rush, such as "type of drug," "warm" and "itchyscratchy feelings," and for environment not being a contributing factor. These findings could be used to improve services for clients through developing a better clientworker understanding of the "rush" and in possibly developing client contact methods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)295-305
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Substance Use
Volume14
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2009

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A Delphi study of the subjective "rush" experience: Understanding the perspective of the injecting drug user to enhance quality of drug intervention'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this