A developmental index using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children: implications for the diagnosis and nature of ADHD.

T. G. Bowers, M. G. Risser, J. F. Suchanec, D. E. Tinker, Jeanette Ramer, M. Domoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The possible utility of Wechsler's Deterioration Index (WDI) in analyzing children's Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R) results was explored in this study. Clinical records of children with learning disabilities (LD) and children with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) were reviewed to determine if the WDI predicted the presence or severity of the disorders. The ages of the children ranged from 6 to 14. In two independent samples of children with LD (n = 35 and n = 26), the WDI did not predict LD status or severity. The LD samples were mostly male--85% and 57%, respectively. However, the WDI scores did significantly distinguish children with ADHD (n = 10) from nondisabled children (n = 10). The results were cross-validated on an independent sample of children with ADHD (n = 17) when compared to non-ADHD children (n = 22) who experienced significant behavioral difficulties. The ADHD samples were also mostly male--90% and 89%, respectively. The WDI classified only 59% of the children with ADHD and 86% of the non-ADHD children correctly. It is recommended that the WDI be considered a developmental index rather than a deterioration index in children. It is also recommended that significant WDI elevation (greater than .20) be considered to raise the question of ADHD, rather than simply yielding a diagnosis of ADHD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)179-185, 195
JournalJournal of learning disabilities
Volume25
Issue number3
StatePublished - Mar 1 1992

Fingerprint

Wechsler Scales
ADHD
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Intelligence
intelligence
Learning Disorders
learning disability
Disabled Children
deficit

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Education
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Bowers, T. G. ; Risser, M. G. ; Suchanec, J. F. ; Tinker, D. E. ; Ramer, Jeanette ; Domoto, M. / A developmental index using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children : implications for the diagnosis and nature of ADHD. In: Journal of learning disabilities. 1992 ; Vol. 25, No. 3. pp. 179-185, 195.
@article{811a67e69288415db10f06bc1a66893c,
title = "A developmental index using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children: implications for the diagnosis and nature of ADHD.",
abstract = "The possible utility of Wechsler's Deterioration Index (WDI) in analyzing children's Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R) results was explored in this study. Clinical records of children with learning disabilities (LD) and children with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) were reviewed to determine if the WDI predicted the presence or severity of the disorders. The ages of the children ranged from 6 to 14. In two independent samples of children with LD (n = 35 and n = 26), the WDI did not predict LD status or severity. The LD samples were mostly male--85{\%} and 57{\%}, respectively. However, the WDI scores did significantly distinguish children with ADHD (n = 10) from nondisabled children (n = 10). The results were cross-validated on an independent sample of children with ADHD (n = 17) when compared to non-ADHD children (n = 22) who experienced significant behavioral difficulties. The ADHD samples were also mostly male--90{\%} and 89{\%}, respectively. The WDI classified only 59{\%} of the children with ADHD and 86{\%} of the non-ADHD children correctly. It is recommended that the WDI be considered a developmental index rather than a deterioration index in children. It is also recommended that significant WDI elevation (greater than .20) be considered to raise the question of ADHD, rather than simply yielding a diagnosis of ADHD.",
author = "Bowers, {T. G.} and Risser, {M. G.} and Suchanec, {J. F.} and Tinker, {D. E.} and Jeanette Ramer and M. Domoto",
year = "1992",
month = "3",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "25",
pages = "179--185, 195",
journal = "Journal of Learning Disabilities",
issn = "0022-2194",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "3",

}

A developmental index using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children : implications for the diagnosis and nature of ADHD. / Bowers, T. G.; Risser, M. G.; Suchanec, J. F.; Tinker, D. E.; Ramer, Jeanette; Domoto, M.

In: Journal of learning disabilities, Vol. 25, No. 3, 01.03.1992, p. 179-185, 195.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - A developmental index using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children

T2 - implications for the diagnosis and nature of ADHD.

AU - Bowers, T. G.

AU - Risser, M. G.

AU - Suchanec, J. F.

AU - Tinker, D. E.

AU - Ramer, Jeanette

AU - Domoto, M.

PY - 1992/3/1

Y1 - 1992/3/1

N2 - The possible utility of Wechsler's Deterioration Index (WDI) in analyzing children's Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R) results was explored in this study. Clinical records of children with learning disabilities (LD) and children with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) were reviewed to determine if the WDI predicted the presence or severity of the disorders. The ages of the children ranged from 6 to 14. In two independent samples of children with LD (n = 35 and n = 26), the WDI did not predict LD status or severity. The LD samples were mostly male--85% and 57%, respectively. However, the WDI scores did significantly distinguish children with ADHD (n = 10) from nondisabled children (n = 10). The results were cross-validated on an independent sample of children with ADHD (n = 17) when compared to non-ADHD children (n = 22) who experienced significant behavioral difficulties. The ADHD samples were also mostly male--90% and 89%, respectively. The WDI classified only 59% of the children with ADHD and 86% of the non-ADHD children correctly. It is recommended that the WDI be considered a developmental index rather than a deterioration index in children. It is also recommended that significant WDI elevation (greater than .20) be considered to raise the question of ADHD, rather than simply yielding a diagnosis of ADHD.

AB - The possible utility of Wechsler's Deterioration Index (WDI) in analyzing children's Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R) results was explored in this study. Clinical records of children with learning disabilities (LD) and children with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) were reviewed to determine if the WDI predicted the presence or severity of the disorders. The ages of the children ranged from 6 to 14. In two independent samples of children with LD (n = 35 and n = 26), the WDI did not predict LD status or severity. The LD samples were mostly male--85% and 57%, respectively. However, the WDI scores did significantly distinguish children with ADHD (n = 10) from nondisabled children (n = 10). The results were cross-validated on an independent sample of children with ADHD (n = 17) when compared to non-ADHD children (n = 22) who experienced significant behavioral difficulties. The ADHD samples were also mostly male--90% and 89%, respectively. The WDI classified only 59% of the children with ADHD and 86% of the non-ADHD children correctly. It is recommended that the WDI be considered a developmental index rather than a deterioration index in children. It is also recommended that significant WDI elevation (greater than .20) be considered to raise the question of ADHD, rather than simply yielding a diagnosis of ADHD.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0026831373&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0026831373&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 1602225

AN - SCOPUS:0026831373

VL - 25

SP - 179-185, 195

JO - Journal of Learning Disabilities

JF - Journal of Learning Disabilities

SN - 0022-2194

IS - 3

ER -