A disease-specific Medicaid expansion for women

The Breast and Cervical Cancer Prevention and Treatment Act of 2000

Paula M. Lantz, Carol S. Weisman, Zena Itani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Breast and Cervical Cancer Prevention and Treatment Act of 2000 (BCCPTA) allows states the option of extending Medicaid eligibility to women diagnosed with breast or cervical cancer through a large federal screening program that does not include resources for treatment. Using qualitative data from interviews with 22 key informants and other sources, we present an analysis of the history and passage of the BCCPTA as a policy response to a perceived "treatment gap" in a national screening program. The results suggest that organizational policy entrepreneurs - primarily the National Breast Cancer Coalition - constructed an effective problem definition (that the government screening program was "unethical" and "broken") with a viable policy solution (an optional disease-specific Medicaid expansion), and pushed this proposal through a policy window opened by a budget surplus and an election year in which women's health issues had broad bipartisan appeal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)79-92
Number of pages14
JournalWomen's Health Issues
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003

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Medicaid
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
cancer
act
Breast Neoplasms
Disease
Government Programs
Organizational Policy
government program
Women's Health
Budgets
Therapeutics
entrepreneur
coalition
appeal
budget
History
election
Interviews
history

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Maternity and Midwifery

Cite this

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A disease-specific Medicaid expansion for women : The Breast and Cervical Cancer Prevention and Treatment Act of 2000. / Lantz, Paula M.; Weisman, Carol S.; Itani, Zena.

In: Women's Health Issues, Vol. 13, No. 3, 01.01.2003, p. 79-92.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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