A Fatal Attraction: The Effect of TV Viewing on Smoking Initiation Among Young Women

Erika K. Johnson, Maria Len-Ríos, Heather Shoenberger, Kyung Jung Han

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study explores whether there is a connection between TV viewing and the intention of young adult women to smoke and their ability to refuse smoking. Young adult women were defined as between 18 and 24 years of age (N = 156). Using Cultivation Theory as a framework, the researchers found that TV viewing positively predicts smoking intentions and negatively predicts the ability to refuse smoking. Accounting for smoking knowledge, current smoking behaviors, and other media use, TV viewing predicts smoking intentions. This suggests that TV viewing may be a powerful predictor of (a) smoking intentions and (b) the inability to refuse a cigarette in a peer pressure/social situation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)688-707
Number of pages20
JournalCommunication Research
Volume46
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2019

Fingerprint

Smoke
smoking
young adult
cultivation theory
social situation
ability
Smoking
Attraction
Intentions

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

Johnson, Erika K. ; Len-Ríos, Maria ; Shoenberger, Heather ; Han, Kyung Jung. / A Fatal Attraction : The Effect of TV Viewing on Smoking Initiation Among Young Women. In: Communication Research. 2019 ; Vol. 46, No. 5. pp. 688-707.
@article{34efef6375f544ed9e059befc8d6c77d,
title = "A Fatal Attraction: The Effect of TV Viewing on Smoking Initiation Among Young Women",
abstract = "This study explores whether there is a connection between TV viewing and the intention of young adult women to smoke and their ability to refuse smoking. Young adult women were defined as between 18 and 24 years of age (N = 156). Using Cultivation Theory as a framework, the researchers found that TV viewing positively predicts smoking intentions and negatively predicts the ability to refuse smoking. Accounting for smoking knowledge, current smoking behaviors, and other media use, TV viewing predicts smoking intentions. This suggests that TV viewing may be a powerful predictor of (a) smoking intentions and (b) the inability to refuse a cigarette in a peer pressure/social situation.",
author = "Johnson, {Erika K.} and Maria Len-R{\'i}os and Heather Shoenberger and Han, {Kyung Jung}",
year = "2019",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0093650216641183",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "46",
pages = "688--707",
journal = "Communication Research",
issn = "0093-6502",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "5",

}

A Fatal Attraction : The Effect of TV Viewing on Smoking Initiation Among Young Women. / Johnson, Erika K.; Len-Ríos, Maria; Shoenberger, Heather; Han, Kyung Jung.

In: Communication Research, Vol. 46, No. 5, 01.07.2019, p. 688-707.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - A Fatal Attraction

T2 - The Effect of TV Viewing on Smoking Initiation Among Young Women

AU - Johnson, Erika K.

AU - Len-Ríos, Maria

AU - Shoenberger, Heather

AU - Han, Kyung Jung

PY - 2019/7/1

Y1 - 2019/7/1

N2 - This study explores whether there is a connection between TV viewing and the intention of young adult women to smoke and their ability to refuse smoking. Young adult women were defined as between 18 and 24 years of age (N = 156). Using Cultivation Theory as a framework, the researchers found that TV viewing positively predicts smoking intentions and negatively predicts the ability to refuse smoking. Accounting for smoking knowledge, current smoking behaviors, and other media use, TV viewing predicts smoking intentions. This suggests that TV viewing may be a powerful predictor of (a) smoking intentions and (b) the inability to refuse a cigarette in a peer pressure/social situation.

AB - This study explores whether there is a connection between TV viewing and the intention of young adult women to smoke and their ability to refuse smoking. Young adult women were defined as between 18 and 24 years of age (N = 156). Using Cultivation Theory as a framework, the researchers found that TV viewing positively predicts smoking intentions and negatively predicts the ability to refuse smoking. Accounting for smoking knowledge, current smoking behaviors, and other media use, TV viewing predicts smoking intentions. This suggests that TV viewing may be a powerful predictor of (a) smoking intentions and (b) the inability to refuse a cigarette in a peer pressure/social situation.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85067204233&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85067204233&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0093650216641183

DO - 10.1177/0093650216641183

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85067204233

VL - 46

SP - 688

EP - 707

JO - Communication Research

JF - Communication Research

SN - 0093-6502

IS - 5

ER -