A genetic model for neurodevelopmental disease

Bradley P. Coe, Santhosh Girirajan, Evan E. Eichler

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The genetic basis of neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric diseases has been advanced by the discovery of large and recurrent copy number variants significantly enriched in cases when compared to controls. The pattern of this variation strongly implies that rare variants contribute significantly to neurological disease; that different genes will be responsible for similar diseases in different families; and that the same 'primary' genetic lesions can result in a different disease outcome depending potentially on the genetic background. Next-generation sequencing technologies are beginning to broaden the spectrum of disease-causing variation and provide specificity by pinpointing both genes and pathways for future diagnostics and therapeutics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)829-836
Number of pages8
JournalCurrent Opinion in Neurobiology
Volume22
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2012

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Genetic Models
Genes
Technology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Coe, Bradley P. ; Girirajan, Santhosh ; Eichler, Evan E. / A genetic model for neurodevelopmental disease. In: Current Opinion in Neurobiology. 2012 ; Vol. 22, No. 5. pp. 829-836.
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A genetic model for neurodevelopmental disease. / Coe, Bradley P.; Girirajan, Santhosh; Eichler, Evan E.

In: Current Opinion in Neurobiology, Vol. 22, No. 5, 01.10.2012, p. 829-836.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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