A global carbon assimilation system based on a dual optimization method

H. Zheng, Y. Li, J. M. Chen, T. Wang, Q. Huang, W. X. Huang, Luheng Wang, S. M. Li, W. P. Yuan, X. Zheng, S. P. Zhang, Z. Q. Chen, F. Jiang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ecological models are effective tools for simulating the distribution of global carbon sources and sinks. However, these models often suffer from substantial biases due to inaccurate simulations of complex ecological processes. We introduce a set of scaling factors (parameters) to an ecological model on the basis of plant functional type (PFT) and latitudes. A global carbon assimilation system (GCAS-DOM) is developed by employing a dual optimization method (DOM) to invert the time-dependent ecological model parameter state and the net carbon flux state simultaneously. We use GCAS-DOM to estimate the global distribution of the CO2 flux on 1° × 1° grid cells for the period from 2001 to 2007. Results show that land and ocean absorb -3.63 ± 0.50 and -1.82 ± 0.16 Pg C yr-1, respectively. North America, Europe and China contribute -0.98 ± 0.15, -0.42 ± 0.08 and -0.20 ± 0.29 Pg C yr-1, respectively. The uncertainties in the flux after optimization by GCAS-DOM have been remarkably reduced by more than 60%. Through parameter optimization, GCAS-DOM can provide improved estimates of the carbon flux for each PFT. Coniferous forest (−0.97 ± 0.27 Pg C yr-1) is the largest contributor to the global carbon sink. Fluxes of once-dominant deciduous forest generated by the Boreal Ecosystems Productivity Simulator (BEPS) are reduced to -0.78 ± 0.23 Pg C yr-1, the third largest carbon sink.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1131-1150
Number of pages20
JournalBiogeosciences
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 24 2015

Fingerprint

system optimization
carbon
carbon sinks
carbon sink
carbon flux
deciduous forests
coniferous forests
uncertainty
oceans
carbon dioxide
coniferous forest
carbon dioxide fixation
method
assimilation
deciduous forest
simulator
China
ecosystems
productivity
ecosystem

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Earth-Surface Processes

Cite this

Zheng, H., Li, Y., Chen, J. M., Wang, T., Huang, Q., Huang, W. X., ... Jiang, F. (2015). A global carbon assimilation system based on a dual optimization method. Biogeosciences, 12(4), 1131-1150. https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-12-1131-2015
Zheng, H. ; Li, Y. ; Chen, J. M. ; Wang, T. ; Huang, Q. ; Huang, W. X. ; Wang, Luheng ; Li, S. M. ; Yuan, W. P. ; Zheng, X. ; Zhang, S. P. ; Chen, Z. Q. ; Jiang, F. / A global carbon assimilation system based on a dual optimization method. In: Biogeosciences. 2015 ; Vol. 12, No. 4. pp. 1131-1150.
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abstract = "Ecological models are effective tools for simulating the distribution of global carbon sources and sinks. However, these models often suffer from substantial biases due to inaccurate simulations of complex ecological processes. We introduce a set of scaling factors (parameters) to an ecological model on the basis of plant functional type (PFT) and latitudes. A global carbon assimilation system (GCAS-DOM) is developed by employing a dual optimization method (DOM) to invert the time-dependent ecological model parameter state and the net carbon flux state simultaneously. We use GCAS-DOM to estimate the global distribution of the CO2 flux on 1° × 1° grid cells for the period from 2001 to 2007. Results show that land and ocean absorb -3.63 ± 0.50 and -1.82 ± 0.16 Pg C yr-1, respectively. North America, Europe and China contribute -0.98 ± 0.15, -0.42 ± 0.08 and -0.20 ± 0.29 Pg C yr-1, respectively. The uncertainties in the flux after optimization by GCAS-DOM have been remarkably reduced by more than 60{\%}. Through parameter optimization, GCAS-DOM can provide improved estimates of the carbon flux for each PFT. Coniferous forest (−0.97 ± 0.27 Pg C yr-1) is the largest contributor to the global carbon sink. Fluxes of once-dominant deciduous forest generated by the Boreal Ecosystems Productivity Simulator (BEPS) are reduced to -0.78 ± 0.23 Pg C yr-1, the third largest carbon sink.",
author = "H. Zheng and Y. Li and Chen, {J. M.} and T. Wang and Q. Huang and Huang, {W. X.} and Luheng Wang and Li, {S. M.} and Yuan, {W. P.} and X. Zheng and Zhang, {S. P.} and Chen, {Z. Q.} and F. Jiang",
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Zheng, H, Li, Y, Chen, JM, Wang, T, Huang, Q, Huang, WX, Wang, L, Li, SM, Yuan, WP, Zheng, X, Zhang, SP, Chen, ZQ & Jiang, F 2015, 'A global carbon assimilation system based on a dual optimization method', Biogeosciences, vol. 12, no. 4, pp. 1131-1150. https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-12-1131-2015

A global carbon assimilation system based on a dual optimization method. / Zheng, H.; Li, Y.; Chen, J. M.; Wang, T.; Huang, Q.; Huang, W. X.; Wang, Luheng; Li, S. M.; Yuan, W. P.; Zheng, X.; Zhang, S. P.; Chen, Z. Q.; Jiang, F.

In: Biogeosciences, Vol. 12, No. 4, 24.02.2015, p. 1131-1150.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - A global carbon assimilation system based on a dual optimization method

AU - Zheng, H.

AU - Li, Y.

AU - Chen, J. M.

AU - Wang, T.

AU - Huang, Q.

AU - Huang, W. X.

AU - Wang, Luheng

AU - Li, S. M.

AU - Yuan, W. P.

AU - Zheng, X.

AU - Zhang, S. P.

AU - Chen, Z. Q.

AU - Jiang, F.

PY - 2015/2/24

Y1 - 2015/2/24

N2 - Ecological models are effective tools for simulating the distribution of global carbon sources and sinks. However, these models often suffer from substantial biases due to inaccurate simulations of complex ecological processes. We introduce a set of scaling factors (parameters) to an ecological model on the basis of plant functional type (PFT) and latitudes. A global carbon assimilation system (GCAS-DOM) is developed by employing a dual optimization method (DOM) to invert the time-dependent ecological model parameter state and the net carbon flux state simultaneously. We use GCAS-DOM to estimate the global distribution of the CO2 flux on 1° × 1° grid cells for the period from 2001 to 2007. Results show that land and ocean absorb -3.63 ± 0.50 and -1.82 ± 0.16 Pg C yr-1, respectively. North America, Europe and China contribute -0.98 ± 0.15, -0.42 ± 0.08 and -0.20 ± 0.29 Pg C yr-1, respectively. The uncertainties in the flux after optimization by GCAS-DOM have been remarkably reduced by more than 60%. Through parameter optimization, GCAS-DOM can provide improved estimates of the carbon flux for each PFT. Coniferous forest (−0.97 ± 0.27 Pg C yr-1) is the largest contributor to the global carbon sink. Fluxes of once-dominant deciduous forest generated by the Boreal Ecosystems Productivity Simulator (BEPS) are reduced to -0.78 ± 0.23 Pg C yr-1, the third largest carbon sink.

AB - Ecological models are effective tools for simulating the distribution of global carbon sources and sinks. However, these models often suffer from substantial biases due to inaccurate simulations of complex ecological processes. We introduce a set of scaling factors (parameters) to an ecological model on the basis of plant functional type (PFT) and latitudes. A global carbon assimilation system (GCAS-DOM) is developed by employing a dual optimization method (DOM) to invert the time-dependent ecological model parameter state and the net carbon flux state simultaneously. We use GCAS-DOM to estimate the global distribution of the CO2 flux on 1° × 1° grid cells for the period from 2001 to 2007. Results show that land and ocean absorb -3.63 ± 0.50 and -1.82 ± 0.16 Pg C yr-1, respectively. North America, Europe and China contribute -0.98 ± 0.15, -0.42 ± 0.08 and -0.20 ± 0.29 Pg C yr-1, respectively. The uncertainties in the flux after optimization by GCAS-DOM have been remarkably reduced by more than 60%. Through parameter optimization, GCAS-DOM can provide improved estimates of the carbon flux for each PFT. Coniferous forest (−0.97 ± 0.27 Pg C yr-1) is the largest contributor to the global carbon sink. Fluxes of once-dominant deciduous forest generated by the Boreal Ecosystems Productivity Simulator (BEPS) are reduced to -0.78 ± 0.23 Pg C yr-1, the third largest carbon sink.

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Zheng H, Li Y, Chen JM, Wang T, Huang Q, Huang WX et al. A global carbon assimilation system based on a dual optimization method. Biogeosciences. 2015 Feb 24;12(4):1131-1150. https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-12-1131-2015