A gravitational wave observatory operating beyond the quantum shot-noise limit

ligo Scientific Collaboration

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

438 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Around the globe several observatories are seeking the first direct detection of gravitational waves (GWs). These waves are predicted by Einstein's general theory of relativity and are generated, for example, by black-hole binary systems. Present GW detectors are Michelson-type kilometre-scale laser interferometers measuring the distance changes between mirrors suspended in vacuum. The sensitivity of these detectors at frequencies above several hundred hertz is limited by the vacuum (zero-point) fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. A quantum technology - the injection of squeezed light - offers a solution to this problem. Here we demonstrate the squeezed-light enhancement of GEO 600, which will be the GW observatory operated by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration in its search for GWs for the next 3-4 years. GEO 600 now operates with its best ever sensitivity, which proves the usefulness of quantum entanglement and the qualification of squeezed light as a key technology for future GW astronomy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)962-965
Number of pages4
JournalNature Physics
Volume7
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

Fingerprint

shot noise
gravitational waves
observatories
vacuum
LIGO (observatory)
globes
sensitivity
detectors
qualifications
astronomy
relativity
electromagnetic fields
interferometers
injection
mirrors
augmentation
lasers

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

ligo Scientific Collaboration. / A gravitational wave observatory operating beyond the quantum shot-noise limit. In: Nature Physics. 2011 ; Vol. 7, No. 12. pp. 962-965.
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A gravitational wave observatory operating beyond the quantum shot-noise limit. / ligo Scientific Collaboration.

In: Nature Physics, Vol. 7, No. 12, 01.01.2011, p. 962-965.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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