A health fundraising experiment using the “foot-in-the-door” technique

Maria Leonora (Nori) G. Comello, Jessica Myrick, April Little Raphiou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Foot-in-the-door (FITD) involves obtaining compliance with a small request to boost compliance with a larger request. Only a few studies to date have tested the technique in health and fundraising contexts, and even fewer have examined the psychological processes involved. To address these gaps, we conducted an experiment as an actual fundraiser for a cancer-awareness organization. The technique activated a self-concept as a supporter of cancer awareness among those in the FITD condition. Donation amount was also higher among those in FITD, but only among those with higher levels of worry and low to moderate levels of preference for consistency.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)206-220
Number of pages15
JournalHealth Marketing Quarterly
Volume33
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2 2016

Fingerprint

Health
Self Concept
Neoplasms
Psychology
Cancer
Fund raising
Experiment
Self-concept
Psychological
Donation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health Professions(all)
  • Marketing

Cite this

Comello, Maria Leonora (Nori) G. ; Myrick, Jessica ; Raphiou, April Little. / A health fundraising experiment using the “foot-in-the-door” technique. In: Health Marketing Quarterly. 2016 ; Vol. 33, No. 3. pp. 206-220.
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A health fundraising experiment using the “foot-in-the-door” technique. / Comello, Maria Leonora (Nori) G.; Myrick, Jessica; Raphiou, April Little.

In: Health Marketing Quarterly, Vol. 33, No. 3, 02.07.2016, p. 206-220.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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