A meta-analysis on the effects of 2,4-D and dicamba drift on soybean and cotton

J. Franklin Egan, Kathryn M. Barlow, David Mortensen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Commercial introduction of cultivars of soybean and cotton genetically modified with resistance to the synthetic auxin herbicides dicamba and 2,4-D will allow these compounds to be used with greater flexibility but may expose susceptible soybean and cotton cultivars to nontarget herbicide drift. From past experience, it is well known that soybean and cotton are both highly sensitive to low-dose exposures of dicamba and 2,4-D. In this study, a meta-analysis approach was used to synthesize data from over seven decades of simulated drift experiments in which investigators treated soybean and cotton with low doses of dicamba and 2,4-D and measured the resulting yields. These data were used to produce global dose-response curves for each crop and herbicide, with crop yield plotted against herbicide dose. The meta-analysis showed that soybean is more susceptible to dicamba in the flowering stage and relatively tolerant to 2,4-D at all growth stages. Conversely, cotton is tolerant to dicamba but extremely sensitive to 2,4-D, especially in the vegetative and preflowering squaring stages. Both crops are highly variable in their responses to synthetic auxin herbicide exposure, with soil moisture and air temperature at the time of exposure identified as key factors. Visual injury symptoms, especially during vegetative stages, are not predictive of final yield loss. Global dose-response curves generated by this meta-analysis can inform guidelines for herbicide applications and provide producers and agricultural professionals with a benchmark of the mean and range of crop yield loss that can be expected from drift or other nontarget exposures to 2,4-D or dicamba. Nomenclature: 2,4-D (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid); dicamba (3,6-dichloro-2-methoxy benzoic acid); glyphosate; soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr.; cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)193-206
Number of pages14
JournalWeed Science
Volume62
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

dicamba
meta-analysis
2,4-D
cotton
soybeans
herbicides
dose response
crop yield
auxins
dosage
soil air
cultivars
crops
glyphosate
Gossypium hirsutum
signs and symptoms (plants)
pesticide application
exposure duration
vegetative growth
Glycine max

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Plant Science

Cite this

Egan, J. Franklin ; Barlow, Kathryn M. ; Mortensen, David. / A meta-analysis on the effects of 2,4-D and dicamba drift on soybean and cotton. In: Weed Science. 2014 ; Vol. 62, No. 1. pp. 193-206.
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A meta-analysis on the effects of 2,4-D and dicamba drift on soybean and cotton. / Egan, J. Franklin; Barlow, Kathryn M.; Mortensen, David.

In: Weed Science, Vol. 62, No. 1, 01.01.2014, p. 193-206.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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