A Methodology for Determining Rate-Dependent Flow Surfaces for Inconel 718

Clifford Jesse Lissenden, III, C. M. Gil, B. A. Lerch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A detailed set of experiments has been conducted in an attempt to characterize the inelastic flow behavior of materials used in aeronautics applications. These experiments have shown that aged (precipitate-hardened) Inconel 718 exhibits an initial nonlinear elastic behavior as well as a strength differential in tension and compression at room temperature. This nonlinear elastic behavior correlates reasonably well with a second order stress-strain law that was developed to account for interactions between dislocations and interstitial solute atoms. Flow loci in the axial-shear stress plane at 25 and 650°C have been determined from yield locus data using both inelastic power and equivalent inelastic strain definitions of flow. Flow loci are more theoretically meaningful than yield loci for describing the time-dependent material response. These flow loci are especially important if they are proportional to the dissipation potential since the normality rule is associated with dissipation and not necessarily with a particular yield or flow definition employed in an experiment. A threshold function that depends only on the second deviatoric stress invariant, J2, is inadequate for predicting the threshold surface (initial yield locus) for Inconel 718 due to the difference in flow behavior in tension and compression. Threshold functions including all three stress invariants (I1, J2, and J3) with each term having units of stress raised to the first or third power were equally successful in fitting the initial flow locus. Addition-ally, both F = al1 + bJ1/22 - 1 and F = b3J3/22 + c3J3 - 1 are shown to represent the data very well. The outward normals for these two representations of the threshold surface are consistent with experimentally determined directions of the inelastic strain rate vectors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)402-411
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Testing and Evaluation
Volume27
Issue number6
StatePublished - Nov 1 1999

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Experiments
Aviation
Shear stress
Strain rate
Precipitates
Atoms
Temperature
metsulfuron methyl
Direction compound

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

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abstract = "A detailed set of experiments has been conducted in an attempt to characterize the inelastic flow behavior of materials used in aeronautics applications. These experiments have shown that aged (precipitate-hardened) Inconel 718 exhibits an initial nonlinear elastic behavior as well as a strength differential in tension and compression at room temperature. This nonlinear elastic behavior correlates reasonably well with a second order stress-strain law that was developed to account for interactions between dislocations and interstitial solute atoms. Flow loci in the axial-shear stress plane at 25 and 650°C have been determined from yield locus data using both inelastic power and equivalent inelastic strain definitions of flow. Flow loci are more theoretically meaningful than yield loci for describing the time-dependent material response. These flow loci are especially important if they are proportional to the dissipation potential since the normality rule is associated with dissipation and not necessarily with a particular yield or flow definition employed in an experiment. A threshold function that depends only on the second deviatoric stress invariant, J2, is inadequate for predicting the threshold surface (initial yield locus) for Inconel 718 due to the difference in flow behavior in tension and compression. Threshold functions including all three stress invariants (I1, J2, and J3) with each term having units of stress raised to the first or third power were equally successful in fitting the initial flow locus. Addition-ally, both F = al1 + bJ1/22 - 1 and F = b3J3/22 + c3J3 - 1 are shown to represent the data very well. The outward normals for these two representations of the threshold surface are consistent with experimentally determined directions of the inelastic strain rate vectors.",
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A Methodology for Determining Rate-Dependent Flow Surfaces for Inconel 718. / Lissenden, III, Clifford Jesse; Gil, C. M.; Lerch, B. A.

In: Journal of Testing and Evaluation, Vol. 27, No. 6, 01.11.1999, p. 402-411.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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