A model for phosphorus transformation and runoff loss for surface-applied manures

P. A. Vadas, W. J. Gburek, A. N. Sharpley, Peter J A Kleinman, P. A. Moore, M. L. Cabrera, R. D. Harmel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Agricultural P transport in runoff is an environmental concern. An important source of P runoff is surface-applied, unincorporated manures, but computer models used to assess P transport do not adequately simulate P release and transport from surface manures. We developed a model to address this limitation. The model operates on a daily basis and simulates manure application to the soil surface, letting 60% of manure P infiltrate into soil if manure slurry with less than 15% solids is applied. The model divides manure P into four pools, water-extractable inorganic and organic P, and stable inorganic and organic P. The model simulates manure dry matter decomposition, and manure stable P transformation to water-extractable P. Manure dry matter and P are assimilated into soil to simulate bioturbation. Water-extractable P is leached from manure when it rains, and a portion of leached P can be transferred to surface runoff. Eighty percent of manure P leached into soil by rain remains in the top 2 cm, while 20% leaches deeper. This 2-cm soil layer contributes P to runoff via desorption. We used data from field studies in Texas, Pennsylvania, Georgia, and Arkansas to build and validate the model. Validation results show the model accurately predicted cumulative P loads in runoff, reflecting successful simulation of the dynamics of manure dry matter, manure and soil P pools, and storm-event runoff P concentrations. Predicted runoff P concentrations were significantly related to (r2 = 0.57) but slightly less than measured concentrations. Our model thus represents an important modification for field or watershed scale models that assess P loss from manured soils.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)324-332
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Environmental Quality
Volume36
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007

Fingerprint

Manures
Runoff
Phosphorus
manure
runoff
phosphorus
Soils
dry matter
soil
loss
Rain
Water
bioturbation
Watersheds
water
slurry
Desorption
desorption
soil surface

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Pollution
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Cite this

Vadas, P. A., Gburek, W. J., Sharpley, A. N., Kleinman, P. J. A., Moore, P. A., Cabrera, M. L., & Harmel, R. D. (2007). A model for phosphorus transformation and runoff loss for surface-applied manures. Journal of Environmental Quality, 36(1), 324-332. https://doi.org/10.2134/jeq2006.0213
Vadas, P. A. ; Gburek, W. J. ; Sharpley, A. N. ; Kleinman, Peter J A ; Moore, P. A. ; Cabrera, M. L. ; Harmel, R. D. / A model for phosphorus transformation and runoff loss for surface-applied manures. In: Journal of Environmental Quality. 2007 ; Vol. 36, No. 1. pp. 324-332.
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Vadas, PA, Gburek, WJ, Sharpley, AN, Kleinman, PJA, Moore, PA, Cabrera, ML & Harmel, RD 2007, 'A model for phosphorus transformation and runoff loss for surface-applied manures', Journal of Environmental Quality, vol. 36, no. 1, pp. 324-332. https://doi.org/10.2134/jeq2006.0213

A model for phosphorus transformation and runoff loss for surface-applied manures. / Vadas, P. A.; Gburek, W. J.; Sharpley, A. N.; Kleinman, Peter J A; Moore, P. A.; Cabrera, M. L.; Harmel, R. D.

In: Journal of Environmental Quality, Vol. 36, No. 1, 01.01.2007, p. 324-332.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Moore, P. A.

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Vadas PA, Gburek WJ, Sharpley AN, Kleinman PJA, Moore PA, Cabrera ML et al. A model for phosphorus transformation and runoff loss for surface-applied manures. Journal of Environmental Quality. 2007 Jan 1;36(1):324-332. https://doi.org/10.2134/jeq2006.0213