A modeling framework for estimating children's residential exposure and dose to chlorpyrifos via dermal residue contact and nondietary ingestion

Valerie G. Zartarian, Halûk Özkaynak, Janet M. Burke, Maria J. Zufall, Marc L. Rigas, Edwin J. Furtaw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

115 Scopus citations

Abstract

To help address the Food Quality Protection Act of 1996, a physically based probabilistic model has been developed to quantify and analyze dermal and nondietary ingestion exposure and dose to pesticides. The Residential Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation Model for Pesticides (Residential-SHEDS) simulates the exposures and doses of children contacting residues on surfaces in treated residences and on turf in treated residential yards. The simulations combine sequential time-location-activity information from children's diaries with microlevel videotaped activity data, probability distributions of measured surface residues and exposure factors, and pharmacokinetic rate constants. Model outputs include individual profiles and population statistics for daily dermal loading, mass in the blood compartment, ingested residue via nondietary objects, and mass of eliminated metabolite, as well as contributions from various routes, pathways, and media. To illustrate the capabilities of the model framework, we applied Residential-SHEDS to estimate children's residential exposure and dose to chlorpyrifos for 12 exposure scenarios: 2 age groups (0-4 and 5-9 years); 2 indoor pesticide application methods (broadcast and crack and crevice); and 3 postindoor application time periods (< 1, 1-7, and 8-30 days). Independent residential turf applications (liquid or granular) were included in each of these scenarios. Despite the current data limitations and model assumptions, the case study predicts exposure and dose estimates that compare well to measurements in the published literature, and provides insights to the relative importance of exposure scenarios and pathways.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)505-514
Number of pages10
JournalEnvironmental health perspectives
Volume108
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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