A mountain full of ghosts: Mourning african american masculinities in colson whitehead's john henry days

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

This article discusses how Colson Whitehead's novel, John Henry Days, questions the accuracy of the portrayal of African American masculinities within a dominant white historiography. It reads the festival portrayed in John Henry Days as a concerted effort to disguise and disrupt any sincere attempts at exposing the realities of working-class African American life in the (post)Reconstruction South. Likewise, the article questions to what extent the contemporary social realities portrayed in the novel allow for a sincere attempt to remember and mourn those working-class African American men who died for the industrial progress celebrated during the novel's festival, the John Henry Days.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)271-284
Number of pages14
JournalAfrican American Review
Volume46
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

Fingerprint

masculinity
festival
working class
social reality
historiography
reconstruction
American
African Americans
Masculinity
Mountains
Ghost
Working Class
Social Reality
Novel
Historiography
Portrayal

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cultural Studies
  • Visual Arts and Performing Arts
  • Literature and Literary Theory

Cite this

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A mountain full of ghosts : Mourning african american masculinities in colson whitehead's john henry days. / Tettenborn, Eva.

In: African American Review, Vol. 46, No. 2-3, 01.01.2013, p. 271-284.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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