A negative feedback mechanism for the long-term stabilization of Earth's surface temperature.

J. C.G. Walker, P. B. Hays, James Kasting

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1080 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We suggest that the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is buffered, over geological time scales, by a negative feedback mechanism in which the rate of weathering of silicate minerals (followed by deposition of carbonate minerals) depends on surface temperature, and surface temperature, in turn, depends on carbon dioxide partial pressure through the greenhouse effect. Although the quantitative details of this mechanism are speculative, it appears able partially to stabilize earth's surface temperature. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9776-9782
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research
Volume86
Issue numberC10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1981

Fingerprint

negative feedback
feedback mechanism
Earth surface
surface temperature
stabilization
Stabilization
Earth (planet)
partial pressure
Feedback
Carbon Dioxide
Partial pressure
carbon dioxide
Carbon dioxide
minerals
Carbonate minerals
Silicate minerals
silicate minerals
carbonate minerals
greenhouse effect
Greenhouse effect

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geophysics
  • Forestry
  • Oceanography
  • Aquatic Science
  • Ecology
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Soil Science
  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Palaeontology

Cite this

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A negative feedback mechanism for the long-term stabilization of Earth's surface temperature. / Walker, J. C.G.; Hays, P. B.; Kasting, James.

In: Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 86, No. C10, 01.01.1981, p. 9776-9782.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Hays, P. B.

AU - Kasting, James

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