A novel synthetic method for hybridoma cell encapsulation

M. Carmen Bañó, Smadar Cohen, Karyn B. Visscher, Harry R. Allcock, Robert Langer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We report here what we believe is the first example of the encapsulation of hybridoma cells within a synthetic polymer by a simple gelation with dissolved cations in water, and at room temperature. Two lines of hybridoma cells were encapsulated within calcium cross-linked polyphosphazene gel microbeads without affecting their viability or their capability to produce antibodies. Interaction of these gel beads with the positively-charged polyelectrolyte, poly(L-lysine), of 102-kD molecular weight, produced a semipermeable membrane that was capable of retaining the cell-secreted antibodies inside the beads. Cell density increased 3.5-fold within 13 days concomitant with a 6.4-fold increase in antibody production. These synthetic membranes have the potential to aid in protein recovery schemes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)468-471
Number of pages4
JournalNature Biotechnology
Volume9
Issue number5
StatePublished - Dec 1 1991

Fingerprint

Hybridomas
Encapsulation
Antibodies
Gels
Membranes
Gelation
Polyelectrolytes
Microspheres
Membrane Potentials
Lysine
Antibody Formation
Cations
Calcium
Polymers
Cell Count
Molecular Weight
Positive ions
Molecular weight
Proteins
Recovery

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biotechnology
  • Bioengineering
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Molecular Medicine

Cite this

Carmen Bañó, M., Cohen, S., Visscher, K. B., Allcock, H. R., & Langer, R. (1991). A novel synthetic method for hybridoma cell encapsulation. Nature Biotechnology, 9(5), 468-471.
Carmen Bañó, M. ; Cohen, Smadar ; Visscher, Karyn B. ; Allcock, Harry R. ; Langer, Robert. / A novel synthetic method for hybridoma cell encapsulation. In: Nature Biotechnology. 1991 ; Vol. 9, No. 5. pp. 468-471.
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Carmen Bañó, M, Cohen, S, Visscher, KB, Allcock, HR & Langer, R 1991, 'A novel synthetic method for hybridoma cell encapsulation', Nature Biotechnology, vol. 9, no. 5, pp. 468-471.

A novel synthetic method for hybridoma cell encapsulation. / Carmen Bañó, M.; Cohen, Smadar; Visscher, Karyn B.; Allcock, Harry R.; Langer, Robert.

In: Nature Biotechnology, Vol. 9, No. 5, 01.12.1991, p. 468-471.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Carmen Bañó M, Cohen S, Visscher KB, Allcock HR, Langer R. A novel synthetic method for hybridoma cell encapsulation. Nature Biotechnology. 1991 Dec 1;9(5):468-471.