A numerical assessment of the interaction of a supercavitating flow with a gas jet

Michael P. Kinzel, Michael H. Krane, Ivan N. Kirschner, Michael J. Moeny

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this work, the interaction between a ventilated supercavity and a jet are examined using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). CFD results compare favorably to experimental data describing bulk cavity behavior. These validated models are used to develop a number of novel insights into the physical characteristics of the interaction. These interactions are described by: (1) the jet ventilation gas appears to dominate the gas attached to the cavity shear layer, (2) the jet appears to cause additional gas leakage by transitioning the cavity from a recirculating flow to an axial flow, (3) the jet creates more slender cavities, and (4) with sufficient momentum, the jet invokes wake instabilities that drive cavity pulsation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)304-313
Number of pages10
JournalOcean Engineering
Volume136
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

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Gases
Computational fluid dynamics
Axial flow
Leakage (fluid)
Ventilation
Momentum

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Ocean Engineering

Cite this

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A numerical assessment of the interaction of a supercavitating flow with a gas jet. / Kinzel, Michael P.; Krane, Michael H.; Kirschner, Ivan N.; Moeny, Michael J.

In: Ocean Engineering, Vol. 136, 01.01.2017, p. 304-313.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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