A numerical exploration of the sensitivity of tropical cyclone rainfall intensity to sea surface temperature

Jenni Evans, B. F. Ryan, J. L. McGregor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is commonly accepted that there is a monotonically increasing relationship between sea surface temperature (SST) and tropical cyclone intensity (as measured by maximum near-surface winds or minimum central pressure). This perceived relationship has been used to extrapolate the effects of climatologically warmer SSTs on tropical cyclones. These warmer SSTs are one of the consequences of doubled CO2 predicted by climate general circulation models (GCMs). Very few investigations have actually critically addressed this SST-storm intensity relationship, however. In this paper, a limited area modeling study is used to explore the potential links between SST and tropical cyclone intensity. Previous work, including some observational data, is reviewed and its implications for the interpretation of the results given here is presented. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)616-623
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Climate
Volume7
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

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precipitation intensity
tropical cyclone
sea surface temperature
surface wind
general circulation model
climate
modeling

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Atmospheric Science

Cite this

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A numerical exploration of the sensitivity of tropical cyclone rainfall intensity to sea surface temperature. / Evans, Jenni; Ryan, B. F.; McGregor, J. L.

In: Journal of Climate, Vol. 7, No. 4, 01.01.1994, p. 616-623.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - It is commonly accepted that there is a monotonically increasing relationship between sea surface temperature (SST) and tropical cyclone intensity (as measured by maximum near-surface winds or minimum central pressure). This perceived relationship has been used to extrapolate the effects of climatologically warmer SSTs on tropical cyclones. These warmer SSTs are one of the consequences of doubled CO2 predicted by climate general circulation models (GCMs). Very few investigations have actually critically addressed this SST-storm intensity relationship, however. In this paper, a limited area modeling study is used to explore the potential links between SST and tropical cyclone intensity. Previous work, including some observational data, is reviewed and its implications for the interpretation of the results given here is presented. -from Authors

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