A quantitative analysis of fish consumption and coronary heart disease mortality

Ariane König, Colleen Bouzan, Joshua T. Cohen, William E. Connor, Penny Margaret Kris-Etherton, George M. Gray, Robert S. Lawrence, David A. Savitz, Steven M. Teutsch

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

135 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although a rich source of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) that may confer multiple health benefits, some fish contain methyl mercury (MeHg), which may harm the developing fetus. U.S. government recommendations for women of childbearing age are to modify consumption of high-MeHg fish to reduce MeHg exposure, while recommendations encourage fish consumption among the general population because of the nutritional benefits. The Harvard Center for Risk Analysis convened an expert panel (see acknowledgments) to quantify the net impact of resulting hypothetical changes in fish consumption across the population. This paper estimates the impact of fish consumption on coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality and nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI). Other papers quantify stroke risk and the impacts of both prenatal MeHg exposure and maternal intake of n-3 PUFAs on cognitive development. This analysis identified articles in a recent qualitative review appropriate for the development of a dose-response relationship. Studies had to satisfy quality criteria, quantify fish intake, and report the precision of the relative risk estimates. Relative risk results were averaged, weighted proportionately by precision. CHD risks associated with MeHg exposure were reviewed qualitatively because the available literature was judged inadequate for quantitative analysis. Eight studies were identified (29 exposure groups). Our analysis estimated that consuming small quantities of fish is associated with a 17% reduction in CHD mortality risk, with each additional serving per week associated with a further reduction in this risk of 3.9%. Small quantities of fish consumption were associated with risk reductions in nonfatal MI risk by 27%, but additional fish consumption conferred no incremental benefits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)335-346
Number of pages12
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005

Fingerprint

Coronary Disease
Fishes
Mortality
Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Risk Reduction Behavior
Myocardial Infarction
Maternal Exposure
Insurance Benefits
Mercury
Population
Fetus
Stroke

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

König, Ariane ; Bouzan, Colleen ; Cohen, Joshua T. ; Connor, William E. ; Kris-Etherton, Penny Margaret ; Gray, George M. ; Lawrence, Robert S. ; Savitz, David A. ; Teutsch, Steven M. / A quantitative analysis of fish consumption and coronary heart disease mortality. In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2005 ; Vol. 29, No. 4. pp. 335-346.
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König, A, Bouzan, C, Cohen, JT, Connor, WE, Kris-Etherton, PM, Gray, GM, Lawrence, RS, Savitz, DA & Teutsch, SM 2005, 'A quantitative analysis of fish consumption and coronary heart disease mortality', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, vol. 29, no. 4, pp. 335-346. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2005.07.001

A quantitative analysis of fish consumption and coronary heart disease mortality. / König, Ariane; Bouzan, Colleen; Cohen, Joshua T.; Connor, William E.; Kris-Etherton, Penny Margaret; Gray, George M.; Lawrence, Robert S.; Savitz, David A.; Teutsch, Steven M.

In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol. 29, No. 4, 01.01.2005, p. 335-346.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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