A randomized controlled trial for obesity and binge eating disorder: Low-energy-density dietary counseling and cognitive-behavioral therapy

Robin M. Masheb, Carlos M. Grilo, Barbara Jean Rolls

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study examined a dietary approach - lowering energy density - for producing weight loss in obese patients with binge eating disorder (BED) who also received cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) to address binge eating. Fifty consecutive participants were randomly assigned to either a six-month individual treatment of CBT plus a low-energy-density diet (CBT. +. ED) or CBT plus General Nutrition counseling not related to weight loss (CBT. +. GN). Assessments occurred at six- and twelve-months. Eighty-six percent of participants completed treatment, and of these, 30% achieved at least a 5% weight loss with rates of binge remission ranging from 55% to 75%. The two treatments did not differ significantly in weight loss or binge remission outcomes. Significant improvements were found for key dietary and metabolic outcomes, with CBT. +. ED producing significantly better dietary outcomes on energy density, and fruit and vegetable consumption, than CBT. +. GN. Reductions in energy density and weight loss were significantly associated providing evidence for the specificity of the treatment effect. These favorable outcomes, and that CBT. +. ED was significantly better at reducing energy density and increasing fruit and vegetable consumption compared to CBT. +. GN, suggest that low-energy-density dietary counseling has promise as an effective method for enhancing CBT for obese individuals with BED.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)821-829
Number of pages9
JournalBehaviour Research and Therapy
Volume49
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011

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Binge-Eating Disorder
Cognitive Therapy
Counseling
Randomized Controlled Trials
Obesity
Weight Loss
Vegetables
Fruit
Bulimia
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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A randomized controlled trial for obesity and binge eating disorder : Low-energy-density dietary counseling and cognitive-behavioral therapy. / Masheb, Robin M.; Grilo, Carlos M.; Rolls, Barbara Jean.

In: Behaviour Research and Therapy, Vol. 49, No. 12, 01.12.2011, p. 821-829.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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