A randomized trial of improved weight loss with a prepared meal plan in overweight and obese patients impact on cardiovascular risk reduction

Jill A. Metz, Judith S. Stern, Penny Kris-Etherton, Molly E. Reusser, Cynthia D. Morris, Daniel C. Hatton, Suzanne Oparil, R. Brian Haynes, Lawrence M. Resnick, F. Xavier Pi-Sunyer, Sharon Clark, Leslie Chester, Margaret McMahon, Geoffrey W. Snyder, David A. McCarron

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

138 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To assess the long-term effects of a prepackaged, nutritionally complete, prepared meal plan compared with a usual-care diet (UCD) on weight loss and cardiovascular risk factors in overweight and obese persons. Design: In this randomized multicenter study, 302 persons with hypertension and dyslipidemia (n = 183) or with type 2 diabetes mellitus (n = 119) were randomized to the nutrient-fortified prepared meal plan (approximately 22% energy from fat, 58% from carbohydrate, and 20% from protein) or to a macronutrient-equivalent UCD. Main Outcome Measures: The primary outcome measure was weight change. Secondary measures were changes in blood pressure or plasma lipid, lipoprotein, glucose, or glycosylated hemoglobin levels; quality of life; nutrient intake; and dietary compliance. Results: After 1 year, weight change in the hypertension/dyslipidemia group was -5.8 ± 6.8 kg with the prepared meal plan vs -1.7 ± 6.5 kg with the UCD plan (P<.001); for the type 2 diabetes mellitus group, the change was -3.0 ± 5.4 kg with the prepared meal plan vs -1.0 ± 3.8 kg with the UCD plan (P<.001) (data given as mean ± SD). In both groups, both interventions improved blood pressure, total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, glycosylated hemoglobin level, and quality of life (P<.02); in the diabetic group, the glucose level was reduced (P<.001). Compared with those in the UCD group, participants with hypertension/dyslipidemia in the prepared meal plan group showed greater improvements in total (P<.01) and high-density lipoprotein (P<.03) cholesterol levels, systolic blood pressure (P<.03), and glucose level (P<.03); in participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus, there were greater improvements in glucose (P=.046) and glycosylated hemoglobin (P<.02) levels. The prepared meal plan group also showed greater improvements in quality of life (P<.05) and compliance (P<.001) than the UCD group. Conclusions: Long-term dietary interventions induced significant weight loss and improved cardiovascular risk in high-risk patients. The prepared meal plan simultaneously provided the simplicity and nutrient composition necessary to maintain long-term compliance and to reduce cardiovascular risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2150-2158
Number of pages9
JournalArchives of Internal Medicine
Volume160
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 24 2000

Fingerprint

Risk Reduction Behavior
Meals
Weight Loss
Diet
Glycosylated Hemoglobin A
Dyslipidemias
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Blood Pressure
Glucose
Quality of Life
Hypertension
Food
Compliance
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Reducing Diet
Weights and Measures
HDL Lipoproteins
LDL Cholesterol
Lipoproteins
Multicenter Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Metz, Jill A. ; Stern, Judith S. ; Kris-Etherton, Penny ; Reusser, Molly E. ; Morris, Cynthia D. ; Hatton, Daniel C. ; Oparil, Suzanne ; Haynes, R. Brian ; Resnick, Lawrence M. ; Pi-Sunyer, F. Xavier ; Clark, Sharon ; Chester, Leslie ; McMahon, Margaret ; Snyder, Geoffrey W. ; McCarron, David A. / A randomized trial of improved weight loss with a prepared meal plan in overweight and obese patients impact on cardiovascular risk reduction. In: Archives of Internal Medicine. 2000 ; Vol. 160, No. 14. pp. 2150-2158.
@article{f5f16e67fcc345729c09d228e95498de,
title = "A randomized trial of improved weight loss with a prepared meal plan in overweight and obese patients impact on cardiovascular risk reduction",
abstract = "Objective: To assess the long-term effects of a prepackaged, nutritionally complete, prepared meal plan compared with a usual-care diet (UCD) on weight loss and cardiovascular risk factors in overweight and obese persons. Design: In this randomized multicenter study, 302 persons with hypertension and dyslipidemia (n = 183) or with type 2 diabetes mellitus (n = 119) were randomized to the nutrient-fortified prepared meal plan (approximately 22{\%} energy from fat, 58{\%} from carbohydrate, and 20{\%} from protein) or to a macronutrient-equivalent UCD. Main Outcome Measures: The primary outcome measure was weight change. Secondary measures were changes in blood pressure or plasma lipid, lipoprotein, glucose, or glycosylated hemoglobin levels; quality of life; nutrient intake; and dietary compliance. Results: After 1 year, weight change in the hypertension/dyslipidemia group was -5.8 ± 6.8 kg with the prepared meal plan vs -1.7 ± 6.5 kg with the UCD plan (P<.001); for the type 2 diabetes mellitus group, the change was -3.0 ± 5.4 kg with the prepared meal plan vs -1.0 ± 3.8 kg with the UCD plan (P<.001) (data given as mean ± SD). In both groups, both interventions improved blood pressure, total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, glycosylated hemoglobin level, and quality of life (P<.02); in the diabetic group, the glucose level was reduced (P<.001). Compared with those in the UCD group, participants with hypertension/dyslipidemia in the prepared meal plan group showed greater improvements in total (P<.01) and high-density lipoprotein (P<.03) cholesterol levels, systolic blood pressure (P<.03), and glucose level (P<.03); in participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus, there were greater improvements in glucose (P=.046) and glycosylated hemoglobin (P<.02) levels. The prepared meal plan group also showed greater improvements in quality of life (P<.05) and compliance (P<.001) than the UCD group. Conclusions: Long-term dietary interventions induced significant weight loss and improved cardiovascular risk in high-risk patients. The prepared meal plan simultaneously provided the simplicity and nutrient composition necessary to maintain long-term compliance and to reduce cardiovascular risk.",
author = "Metz, {Jill A.} and Stern, {Judith S.} and Penny Kris-Etherton and Reusser, {Molly E.} and Morris, {Cynthia D.} and Hatton, {Daniel C.} and Suzanne Oparil and Haynes, {R. Brian} and Resnick, {Lawrence M.} and Pi-Sunyer, {F. Xavier} and Sharon Clark and Leslie Chester and Margaret McMahon and Snyder, {Geoffrey W.} and McCarron, {David A.}",
year = "2000",
month = "7",
day = "24",
doi = "10.1001/archinte.160.14.2150",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "160",
pages = "2150--2158",
journal = "JAMA Internal Medicine",
issn = "2168-6106",
publisher = "American Medical Association",
number = "14",

}

Metz, JA, Stern, JS, Kris-Etherton, P, Reusser, ME, Morris, CD, Hatton, DC, Oparil, S, Haynes, RB, Resnick, LM, Pi-Sunyer, FX, Clark, S, Chester, L, McMahon, M, Snyder, GW & McCarron, DA 2000, 'A randomized trial of improved weight loss with a prepared meal plan in overweight and obese patients impact on cardiovascular risk reduction', Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 160, no. 14, pp. 2150-2158. https://doi.org/10.1001/archinte.160.14.2150

A randomized trial of improved weight loss with a prepared meal plan in overweight and obese patients impact on cardiovascular risk reduction. / Metz, Jill A.; Stern, Judith S.; Kris-Etherton, Penny; Reusser, Molly E.; Morris, Cynthia D.; Hatton, Daniel C.; Oparil, Suzanne; Haynes, R. Brian; Resnick, Lawrence M.; Pi-Sunyer, F. Xavier; Clark, Sharon; Chester, Leslie; McMahon, Margaret; Snyder, Geoffrey W.; McCarron, David A.

In: Archives of Internal Medicine, Vol. 160, No. 14, 24.07.2000, p. 2150-2158.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - A randomized trial of improved weight loss with a prepared meal plan in overweight and obese patients impact on cardiovascular risk reduction

AU - Metz, Jill A.

AU - Stern, Judith S.

AU - Kris-Etherton, Penny

AU - Reusser, Molly E.

AU - Morris, Cynthia D.

AU - Hatton, Daniel C.

AU - Oparil, Suzanne

AU - Haynes, R. Brian

AU - Resnick, Lawrence M.

AU - Pi-Sunyer, F. Xavier

AU - Clark, Sharon

AU - Chester, Leslie

AU - McMahon, Margaret

AU - Snyder, Geoffrey W.

AU - McCarron, David A.

PY - 2000/7/24

Y1 - 2000/7/24

N2 - Objective: To assess the long-term effects of a prepackaged, nutritionally complete, prepared meal plan compared with a usual-care diet (UCD) on weight loss and cardiovascular risk factors in overweight and obese persons. Design: In this randomized multicenter study, 302 persons with hypertension and dyslipidemia (n = 183) or with type 2 diabetes mellitus (n = 119) were randomized to the nutrient-fortified prepared meal plan (approximately 22% energy from fat, 58% from carbohydrate, and 20% from protein) or to a macronutrient-equivalent UCD. Main Outcome Measures: The primary outcome measure was weight change. Secondary measures were changes in blood pressure or plasma lipid, lipoprotein, glucose, or glycosylated hemoglobin levels; quality of life; nutrient intake; and dietary compliance. Results: After 1 year, weight change in the hypertension/dyslipidemia group was -5.8 ± 6.8 kg with the prepared meal plan vs -1.7 ± 6.5 kg with the UCD plan (P<.001); for the type 2 diabetes mellitus group, the change was -3.0 ± 5.4 kg with the prepared meal plan vs -1.0 ± 3.8 kg with the UCD plan (P<.001) (data given as mean ± SD). In both groups, both interventions improved blood pressure, total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, glycosylated hemoglobin level, and quality of life (P<.02); in the diabetic group, the glucose level was reduced (P<.001). Compared with those in the UCD group, participants with hypertension/dyslipidemia in the prepared meal plan group showed greater improvements in total (P<.01) and high-density lipoprotein (P<.03) cholesterol levels, systolic blood pressure (P<.03), and glucose level (P<.03); in participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus, there were greater improvements in glucose (P=.046) and glycosylated hemoglobin (P<.02) levels. The prepared meal plan group also showed greater improvements in quality of life (P<.05) and compliance (P<.001) than the UCD group. Conclusions: Long-term dietary interventions induced significant weight loss and improved cardiovascular risk in high-risk patients. The prepared meal plan simultaneously provided the simplicity and nutrient composition necessary to maintain long-term compliance and to reduce cardiovascular risk.

AB - Objective: To assess the long-term effects of a prepackaged, nutritionally complete, prepared meal plan compared with a usual-care diet (UCD) on weight loss and cardiovascular risk factors in overweight and obese persons. Design: In this randomized multicenter study, 302 persons with hypertension and dyslipidemia (n = 183) or with type 2 diabetes mellitus (n = 119) were randomized to the nutrient-fortified prepared meal plan (approximately 22% energy from fat, 58% from carbohydrate, and 20% from protein) or to a macronutrient-equivalent UCD. Main Outcome Measures: The primary outcome measure was weight change. Secondary measures were changes in blood pressure or plasma lipid, lipoprotein, glucose, or glycosylated hemoglobin levels; quality of life; nutrient intake; and dietary compliance. Results: After 1 year, weight change in the hypertension/dyslipidemia group was -5.8 ± 6.8 kg with the prepared meal plan vs -1.7 ± 6.5 kg with the UCD plan (P<.001); for the type 2 diabetes mellitus group, the change was -3.0 ± 5.4 kg with the prepared meal plan vs -1.0 ± 3.8 kg with the UCD plan (P<.001) (data given as mean ± SD). In both groups, both interventions improved blood pressure, total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, glycosylated hemoglobin level, and quality of life (P<.02); in the diabetic group, the glucose level was reduced (P<.001). Compared with those in the UCD group, participants with hypertension/dyslipidemia in the prepared meal plan group showed greater improvements in total (P<.01) and high-density lipoprotein (P<.03) cholesterol levels, systolic blood pressure (P<.03), and glucose level (P<.03); in participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus, there were greater improvements in glucose (P=.046) and glycosylated hemoglobin (P<.02) levels. The prepared meal plan group also showed greater improvements in quality of life (P<.05) and compliance (P<.001) than the UCD group. Conclusions: Long-term dietary interventions induced significant weight loss and improved cardiovascular risk in high-risk patients. The prepared meal plan simultaneously provided the simplicity and nutrient composition necessary to maintain long-term compliance and to reduce cardiovascular risk.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034710293&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034710293&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1001/archinte.160.14.2150

DO - 10.1001/archinte.160.14.2150

M3 - Article

C2 - 10904458

AN - SCOPUS:0034710293

VL - 160

SP - 2150

EP - 2158

JO - JAMA Internal Medicine

JF - JAMA Internal Medicine

SN - 2168-6106

IS - 14

ER -