A rant good for business: Communicative capitalism and the capture of anti-racist resistance

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Following Richard Sherman’s infamous postgame interview after the 2013 NFC championship game, the popular media mobilized in rebuttal to what appeared to be the rampant expression of racism on Twitter and other social media. Articles on the websites for Grantland, Deadspin, The Nation, Esquire, Ebony, and many others shamed Sherman’s racist detractors enthusiastically. This essay argues that the Sherman incident charted an elaborate anti-racist political argument calibrated to reflect the demands and objectives of neoliberal capitalism. I advance this argument in two main sections. First, I explain how the relationship between anti-racism and neoliberalism is complicated by what Jodi Dean calls communicative capitalism, a situation that neutralizes the purported effects of anti-racist speech in support of Richard Sherman. Second, I show how Sherman’s challenge to the notion of Black respectability renders his blackness imaginary, a move that depoliticizes capitalist relations in the name of anti-racism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)39-48
Number of pages10
JournalPopular Communication
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2016

Fingerprint

anti-racism
Websites
capitalist society
twitter
social media
neoliberalism
racism
website
Industry
incident
interview

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication

Cite this

@article{930e2abd6c034b5ca37826fd07ce1add,
title = "A rant good for business: Communicative capitalism and the capture of anti-racist resistance",
abstract = "Following Richard Sherman’s infamous postgame interview after the 2013 NFC championship game, the popular media mobilized in rebuttal to what appeared to be the rampant expression of racism on Twitter and other social media. Articles on the websites for Grantland, Deadspin, The Nation, Esquire, Ebony, and many others shamed Sherman’s racist detractors enthusiastically. This essay argues that the Sherman incident charted an elaborate anti-racist political argument calibrated to reflect the demands and objectives of neoliberal capitalism. I advance this argument in two main sections. First, I explain how the relationship between anti-racism and neoliberalism is complicated by what Jodi Dean calls communicative capitalism, a situation that neutralizes the purported effects of anti-racist speech in support of Richard Sherman. Second, I show how Sherman’s challenge to the notion of Black respectability renders his blackness imaginary, a move that depoliticizes capitalist relations in the name of anti-racism.",
author = "Khan, {Abraham Iqbal}",
year = "2016",
month = "1",
day = "2",
doi = "10.1080/15405702.2015.1084629",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "14",
pages = "39--48",
journal = "Popular Communication",
issn = "1540-5702",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "1",

}

A rant good for business : Communicative capitalism and the capture of anti-racist resistance. / Khan, Abraham Iqbal.

In: Popular Communication, Vol. 14, No. 1, 02.01.2016, p. 39-48.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - A rant good for business

T2 - Communicative capitalism and the capture of anti-racist resistance

AU - Khan, Abraham Iqbal

PY - 2016/1/2

Y1 - 2016/1/2

N2 - Following Richard Sherman’s infamous postgame interview after the 2013 NFC championship game, the popular media mobilized in rebuttal to what appeared to be the rampant expression of racism on Twitter and other social media. Articles on the websites for Grantland, Deadspin, The Nation, Esquire, Ebony, and many others shamed Sherman’s racist detractors enthusiastically. This essay argues that the Sherman incident charted an elaborate anti-racist political argument calibrated to reflect the demands and objectives of neoliberal capitalism. I advance this argument in two main sections. First, I explain how the relationship between anti-racism and neoliberalism is complicated by what Jodi Dean calls communicative capitalism, a situation that neutralizes the purported effects of anti-racist speech in support of Richard Sherman. Second, I show how Sherman’s challenge to the notion of Black respectability renders his blackness imaginary, a move that depoliticizes capitalist relations in the name of anti-racism.

AB - Following Richard Sherman’s infamous postgame interview after the 2013 NFC championship game, the popular media mobilized in rebuttal to what appeared to be the rampant expression of racism on Twitter and other social media. Articles on the websites for Grantland, Deadspin, The Nation, Esquire, Ebony, and many others shamed Sherman’s racist detractors enthusiastically. This essay argues that the Sherman incident charted an elaborate anti-racist political argument calibrated to reflect the demands and objectives of neoliberal capitalism. I advance this argument in two main sections. First, I explain how the relationship between anti-racism and neoliberalism is complicated by what Jodi Dean calls communicative capitalism, a situation that neutralizes the purported effects of anti-racist speech in support of Richard Sherman. Second, I show how Sherman’s challenge to the notion of Black respectability renders his blackness imaginary, a move that depoliticizes capitalist relations in the name of anti-racism.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84956670486&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84956670486&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/15405702.2015.1084629

DO - 10.1080/15405702.2015.1084629

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84956670486

VL - 14

SP - 39

EP - 48

JO - Popular Communication

JF - Popular Communication

SN - 1540-5702

IS - 1

ER -