A real-time device for converting Doppler ultrasound audio signals into fluid flow velocity

Michael D. Herr, Cynthia S. Hogeman, Dennis W. Koch, Anandi Krishnan, Afsana Momen, Urs A. Leuenberger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A Doppler signal converter has been developed to facilitate cardiovascular and exercise physiology research. This device directly converts audio signals from a clinical Doppler ultrasound imaging system into a real-time analog signal that accurately represents blood flow velocity and is easily recorded by any standard data acquisition system. This real-time flow velocity signal, when simultaneously recorded with other physiological signals of interest, permits the observation of transient flow response to experimental interventions in a manner not possible when using standard Doppler imaging devices. This converted flow velocity signal also permits a more robust and less subjective analysis of data in a fraction of the time required by previous analytic methods. This signal converter provides this capability inexpensively and requires no modification of either the imaging or data acquisition system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)H1626-H1632
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology
Volume298
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2010

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Doppler Ultrasonography
Information Systems
Equipment and Supplies
Cardiovascular Physiological Phenomena
Blood Flow Velocity
Observation
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Herr, Michael D. ; Hogeman, Cynthia S. ; Koch, Dennis W. ; Krishnan, Anandi ; Momen, Afsana ; Leuenberger, Urs A. / A real-time device for converting Doppler ultrasound audio signals into fluid flow velocity. In: American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology. 2010 ; Vol. 298, No. 5. pp. H1626-H1632.
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A real-time device for converting Doppler ultrasound audio signals into fluid flow velocity. / Herr, Michael D.; Hogeman, Cynthia S.; Koch, Dennis W.; Krishnan, Anandi; Momen, Afsana; Leuenberger, Urs A.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology, Vol. 298, No. 5, 01.05.2010, p. H1626-H1632.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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