A retrospective chart review evaluating the association of psychological disorders and Vitamin D deficiency with celiac disease

Sharuq Sarela, Diane V. Thompson, Barbara Nagrant, Payal Thakkar, Kofi Clarke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Data show that deficiencies in Vitamin D have been linked to certain psychological disorders and celiac disease. This study was designed to evaluate the association of psychological comorbidities and Vitamin D deficiency with celiac disease. Additionally, any association of psychological comorbidities with gender and age at diagnosis with celiac disease was evaluated. METHODS: This was a retrospective chart review of a cohort of patients with celiac disease presenting for clinical care at a tertiary care referral hospital. Patient age, age at diagnosis of celiac disease, gender, and 25-OH Vitamin D levels were recorded. Self-reported history of any psychological and/or psychiatric disease were also recorded and analyzed. RESULTS : Fifty-one patients with celiac disease were included. Forty-seven percent reported a history of a psychological and/or psychiatric disease of which anxiety, depression, and mixed anxiety-depressive disorder were the most common. Age at diagnosis of celiac disease was significantly lower, by ∼10 years, in patients with a coexistent psychological comorbidity (P=0.008). Approximately 41% of patients reported Vitamin D deficiency, but their mean age was not significantly different from patients without a deficiency. CONCLUSIONS: Celiac disease appears to be diagnosed earlier in patients with associated psychological comorbidity. There was no increased association of Vitamin D deficiency and psychological/psychiatric comorbidity in patients with celiac disease. Further research is needed to help us better understand this complex relationship.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)240-244
Number of pages5
JournalMinerva Gastroenterologica e Dietologica
Volume62
Issue number3
StatePublished - Sep 1 2016

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Vitamin D Deficiency
Celiac Disease
Psychology
Comorbidity
Psychiatry
Tertiary Healthcare
Depressive Disorder
Anxiety Disorders
Tertiary Care Centers
Vitamin D
Anxiety
Depression

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

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title = "A retrospective chart review evaluating the association of psychological disorders and Vitamin D deficiency with celiac disease",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Data show that deficiencies in Vitamin D have been linked to certain psychological disorders and celiac disease. This study was designed to evaluate the association of psychological comorbidities and Vitamin D deficiency with celiac disease. Additionally, any association of psychological comorbidities with gender and age at diagnosis with celiac disease was evaluated. METHODS: This was a retrospective chart review of a cohort of patients with celiac disease presenting for clinical care at a tertiary care referral hospital. Patient age, age at diagnosis of celiac disease, gender, and 25-OH Vitamin D levels were recorded. Self-reported history of any psychological and/or psychiatric disease were also recorded and analyzed. RESULTS : Fifty-one patients with celiac disease were included. Forty-seven percent reported a history of a psychological and/or psychiatric disease of which anxiety, depression, and mixed anxiety-depressive disorder were the most common. Age at diagnosis of celiac disease was significantly lower, by ∼10 years, in patients with a coexistent psychological comorbidity (P=0.008). Approximately 41{\%} of patients reported Vitamin D deficiency, but their mean age was not significantly different from patients without a deficiency. CONCLUSIONS: Celiac disease appears to be diagnosed earlier in patients with associated psychological comorbidity. There was no increased association of Vitamin D deficiency and psychological/psychiatric comorbidity in patients with celiac disease. Further research is needed to help us better understand this complex relationship.",
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A retrospective chart review evaluating the association of psychological disorders and Vitamin D deficiency with celiac disease. / Sarela, Sharuq; Thompson, Diane V.; Nagrant, Barbara; Thakkar, Payal; Clarke, Kofi.

In: Minerva Gastroenterologica e Dietologica, Vol. 62, No. 3, 01.09.2016, p. 240-244.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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